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Past Exhibitions

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 11, 2017 - October 13, 2017


The Woman Question

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka

March 14, 2017 - June 30, 2017


You Say You Want a Revolution

American Artists and the Communist Party

October 18, 2016 - March 4, 2017


Recent Acquisitions

July 12, 2016 - October 7, 2016


Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Featuring Watercolors and Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection

March 29, 2016 - July 1, 2016


Paula Modersohn-Becker

Art and Life

November 3, 2015 - March 19, 2016


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 21, 2015 - October 16, 2015


Leonard Baskin

Wunderkammer

April 23, 2015 - July 2, 2015


Alternate Histories

Celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

January 15, 2015 - April 11, 2015


Marie-Louise Motesiczky

The Mother Paintings

October 7, 2014 - December 24, 2014


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 15, 2014 - September 26, 2014


Ilija/Mangelos

Father & Son, Inside & Out

April 24, 2014 - July 3, 2014


Modern Furies

The Lessons and Legacy of World War I

January 21, 2014 - April 12, 2014


Käthe Kollwitz

The Complete Print Cycles

October 8, 2013 - December 28, 2013


Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

July 9, 2013 - September 27, 2013


Face Time

Self and Identity in Expressionist Portraiture

April 9, 2013 - June 28, 2013


Story Lines

Tracing the Narrative of "Outsider" Art

January 15, 2013 - March 30, 2013


Egon Schiele's Women

October 23, 2012 - December 28, 2012


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 17, 2012 - October 13, 2012


Mad As Hell!

New Work (and Some Classics) by Sue Coe

April 17, 2012 - July 3, 2012


The Ins and Outs of Self-Taught Art

Reflections on a Shifting Field

January 10, 2012 - April 7, 2012


The Lady and the Tramp

Images of Women in Austrian and German Art

October 11, 2011 - December 30, 2011


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 5, 2011 - September 30, 2011


Decadence & Decay

Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, George Grosz

April 12, 2011 - June 24, 2011


Self-Taught Painters in American 1800-1950

Revisiting the Tradition

January 11, 2011 - April 2, 2011


Marie-Louise Motesiczky

Paradise Lost & Found

October 12, 2010 - December 30, 2010


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 13, 2010 - October 1, 2010


Käthe Kollwitz

A Portrait of the Artist

April 13, 2010 - June 25, 2010


Seventy Years Grandma Moses

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Artist's "Discovery"

February 3, 2010 - April 3, 2010


Egon Schiele as Printmaker

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 3, 2009 - January 23, 2010


From Brücke To Bauhaus

The Meanings of Modernity in Germany, 1905-1933

March 31, 2009 - June 26, 2009


They Taught Themselves

American Self-Taught Painters Between the World Wars

January 9, 2009 - March 14, 2009


Elephants We Must Never Forget

New Paintings Drawings and Prints by Sue Coe

October 14, 2008 - December 20, 2008


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2008 - September 26, 2008


Hope or Menace?

Communism in Germany Between the World Wars

March 25, 2008 - June 13, 2008


Transforming Reality

Pattern and Design in Modern and Self-Taught Art

January 15, 2008 - March 8, 2008


Leonard Baskin

Proofs and Process

October 9, 2007 - January 5, 2008


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 5, 2007 - September 28, 2007


Who Paid the Piper?

The Art of Patronage in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna

March 8, 2007 - May 26, 2007


Fairy Tale, Myth and Fantasy

Approaches to Spirituality in Art

December 7, 2006 - February 3, 2007


More Than Coffee was Served

Café Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna and Weimar Germany

September 19, 2006 - November 25, 2006


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 6, 2006 - September 8, 2006


Parallel Visions II

"Outsider" and "Insider" Art Today

April 5, 2006 - May 26, 2006


Ilija!

His First American Exhibtion

January 17, 2006 - March 18, 2006


Coming of Age

Egon Schiele and the Modernist Culture of Youth

November 15, 2005 - January 7, 2006


Sue Coe:

Sheep of Fools

September 20, 2005 - November 5, 2005


Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

June 7, 2005 - September 9, 2005


Every Picture Tells a Story

The Narrative Impulse in Modern and Contemporary Art

April 5, 2005 - May 27, 2005


65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part II

Self-Taught Artists

January 18, 2005 - March 26, 2005


65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part I

Austrian and German Expressionism

October 28, 2004 - January 8, 2005


Sue Coe: Bully: Master of the Global Merry-Go-Round and Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 8, 2004 - October 16, 2004


Animals & Us

The Animal in Contemporary Art

April 1, 2004 - May 22, 2004


Henry Darger

Art and Myth

January 15, 2004 - March 20, 2004


Body and Soul

Expressionism and the Human Figure

October 7, 2003 - January 3, 2004


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2003 - September 12, 2003


In Search of the "Total Artwork"

Viennese Art and Design 1897–1932

April 8, 2003 - June 14, 2003


Russia's Self-Taught Artists

A New Perspective on the "Outsider"

January 14, 2003 - March 29, 2003


Käthe Kollwitz:

Master Printmaker

October 1, 2002 - January 4, 2003


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 25, 2002 - September 20, 2002


Workers of the World

Modern Images of Labor

April 2, 2002 - June 15, 2002


Grandma Moses

Reflections of America

January 15, 2002 - March 16, 2002


Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoscha

From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

November 23, 2001 - January 5, 2002


The "Black-and-White" Show

Expressionist Graphics in Austria & Germany

September 20, 2001 - November 10, 2001


Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 26, 2001 - September 7, 2001


Art with an Agenda

Politics, Persuasion, Illustration and Decoration

April 10, 2001 - June 16, 2001


"Our Beautiful and Tormented Austria!": Art Brut in the Land of Freud

January 18, 2001 - March 17, 2001


The Tragedy of War

November 16, 2000 - January 6, 2001


The Expressionist City

September 19, 2000 - November 4, 2000


Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 20, 2000 - September 8, 2000


From Façade to Psyche

Turn-of-the-Century Portraiture in Austria & Germany

March 28, 2000 - June 10, 2000


European Self-Taught Art

Brut or Naive?

January 18, 2000 - March 11, 2000


Saved From Europe

In Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 6, 1999 - January 8, 2000


The Modern Child

(Images of Children in Twentieth-Century Art)

September 14, 1999 - November 6, 1999


Recent Acquisitions

(And a Look at Sixty Years of Art Dealing)

June 15, 1999 - September 3, 1999


Sue Coe: The Pit

The Tragical Tale of the Rise and Fall of a Vivisector

March 30, 1999 - June 5, 1999


Henry Darger and His Realms

January 14, 1999 - March 13, 1999


Becoming Käthe Kollwitz

An Artist and Her Influences

November 17, 1998 - December 31, 1998


George Grosz - Elfriede Lohse-Wächtler

Art & Gender in Weimar Germany

September 23, 1998 - November 11, 1998


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts About Looted Art)

June 9, 1998 - September 11, 1998


Taboo

Repression and Revolt in Modern Art

March 26, 1998 - May 30, 1998


Sacred & Profane

Michel Nedjar and Expressionist Primitivism

January 13, 1998 - March 14, 1998


Egon Schiele (1890-1918)

Master Draughtsman

November 18, 1997 - January 3, 1998


The New Objectivity

Realism in Weimar-Era Germany

September 16, 1997 - November 8, 1997


Recent Acquisitions

A Question of Quality

June 10, 1997 - September 5, 1997


Käthe Kollwitz - Lea Grundig

Two German Women & The Art of Protest

March 25, 1997 - May 31, 1997


That Way Madness Lies

Expressionism and the Art of Gugging

January 14, 1997 - March 15, 1997


The Viennese Line

Art and Design Circa 1900

November 18, 1996 - January 4, 1997


Emil Nolde - Christian Rohlfs

Two German Expressionist Masters

September 24, 1996 - November 9, 1996


Breaking All The Rules

Art in Transition

June 11, 1996 - September 6, 1996


Sue Coe's Ship of Fools

March 26, 1996 - May 24, 1996


New York Folk

Lawrence Lebduska, Abraham Levin, Isreal Litwak

January 16, 1996 - March 16, 1996


The Fractured Form

Expressionism and the Human Body

November 15, 1995 - January 6, 1996


From Left to Right

Social Realism in Germany and Russia, Circa 1919-1933

September 19, 1995 - November 4, 1995


Recent Acquisitions

June 20, 1995 - September 8, 1995


On the Brink 1900-2000

The Turning of Two Centuries

March 28, 1995 - May 26, 1995


Earl Cummingham - Grandma Moses

Visions of America

January 17, 1995 - March 18, 1995


Drawn to Text: Comix Artists as Book Illustrators

November 15, 1994 - January 7, 1995


Three Berlin Artists of the Weimar Era: Hannah Höch, Käthe Kollwitz, Jeanne Mam

September 13, 1994 - November 5, 1994


55th Anniversary Exhibition in Memory of Otto Kallir

June 7, 1994 - September 2, 1994


Sue Coe: We All Fall Down

March 29, 1994 - May 27, 1994


The Forgotten Folk Art of the 1940's

January 18, 1994 - March 19, 1994


Symbolism and the Austrian Avant Garde

Klimt, Schiele and their Contemporaries

November 16, 1993 - January 8, 1994


Art and Politics in Weimar Germany

September 14, 1993 - November 6, 1993


Recent Acquisitions

June 8, 1993 - September 3, 1993


The "Outsider" Question

Non-Academic Art from 1900 to the Present

March 23, 1993 - May 28, 1993


The Dance of Death

Images of Mortality in German Art

January 19, 1993 - March 13, 1993


Art Spiegelman

The Road to Maus

November 17, 1992 - January 9, 1993


Käthe Kollwitz

In Celebration of the 125th Anniversary of the Artist's Birth

September 15, 1992 - November 7, 1992


Naive Visions/Art Nouveau and Expressionism/Sue Coe: The Road to the White House

May 19, 1992 - September 4, 1992


Richard Gerstl/Oskar Kokoschka

March 17, 1992 - May 9, 1992


Scandal, Outrage, Censorship

Controversy in Modern Art

January 21, 1992 - March 7, 1992


Viennese Graphic Design

From Secession to Expressionism

November 19, 1991 - January 11, 1992


The Expressionist Figure

September 10, 1991 - November 9, 1991


Recent Acquisitions

Themes and Variations

May 14, 1991 - August 16, 1991


Sue Coe Retrospective

Political Document of a Decade

March 12, 1991 - May 5, 1991


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, drawings and prints

January 22, 1991 - March 2, 1991


Egon Schiele

November 13, 1990 - January 12, 1991


Lovis Corinth

A Retrospective

September 11, 1990 - November 3, 1990


Recent Acquisitions

June 12, 1990 - August 31, 1990


Max Klinger, Käthe Kollwitz, Alfred Kubin

A Study in Influences

March 27, 1990 - June 2, 1990


The Narrative in Art

January 23, 1990 - March 17, 1990


Grandma Moses

November 14, 1989 - January 13, 1990


Sue Coe

Porkopolis--Animals and Industry

September 19, 1989 - November 4, 1989


The Galerie St. Etienne

A History in Documents and Pictures

June 20, 1989 - September 8, 1989


Gustav Klimt

Paintings and Drawings

April 11, 1989 - June 10, 1989


Fifty Years Galerie St. Etienne: An Overview

February 14, 1989 - April 1, 1989


Folk Artists at Work

Morris Hirshfield, John Kane and Grandma Moses

November 15, 1988 - January 14, 1989


Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

June 14, 1988 - September 16, 1988


From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

April 12, 1988 - May 27, 1988


Three Pre-Expressionists

Lovis Corinth Käthe Kollwitz Paula Modersohn-Becker

January 26, 1988 - March 12, 1988


Käthe Kollwitz

The Power of the Print

November 17, 1987 - January 16, 1988


Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

April 7, 1987 - October 31, 1987


Folk Art of This Century

February 10, 1987 - March 28, 1987


Oskar Kokoschka and His Time

November 25, 1986 - January 31, 1987


Viennese Design and Wiener Werkstätte

September 23, 1986 - November 8, 1986


Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, Drawings and Prints

May 27, 1986 - September 13, 1986


Expressionist Painters

March 25, 1986 - May 10, 1986


Käthe Kollwitz/Paula Modersohn-Becker

January 28, 1986 - March 15, 1986


The Art of Giving

December 3, 1985 - January 18, 1986


Expressionists on Paper

October 8, 1985 - November 23, 1985


European and American Landscapes

June 4, 1985 - September 13, 1985


Expressionist Printmaking

Aspects of its Genesis and Development

April 1, 1985 - May 24, 1985


Expressionist Masters

January 18, 1985 - March 23, 1985


Arnold Schoenberg's Vienna

November 13, 1984 - January 5, 1985


Grandma Moses and Selected Folk Paintings

September 25, 1984 - November 3, 1984


American Folk Art

People, Places and Things

June 12, 1984 - September 14, 1984


John Kane

Modern America's First Folk Painter

April 17, 1984 - May 25, 1984


Eugène Mihaesco

The Illustrator as Artist

February 28, 1984 - April 7, 1984


Early Expressionist Masters

January 17, 1984 - February 18, 1984


Paula Modersohn-Becker

Germany's Pioneer Modernist

November 15, 1983 - January 7, 1984


Gustav Klimt

Drawings and Selected Paintings

September 20, 1983 - November 5, 1983


Early and Late

Drawings, Paintings & Prints from Academicism to Expressionism

June 1, 1983 - September 2, 1983


Alfred Kubin

Visions From The Other Side

March 22, 1983 - May 7, 1983


20th Century Folk

The First Generation

January 18, 1983 - March 12, 1983


Grandma Moses

The Artist Behind the Myth

November 15, 1982 - January 8, 1983


Käthe Kollwitz

The Artist as Printmaker

September 28, 1982 - November 6, 1982


Aspects of Modernism

June 1, 1982 - September 3, 1982


The Human Perspective

Recent Acquisitions

March 16, 1982 - May 15, 1982


19th and 20th Century European and American Folk Art

January 19, 1982 - March 6, 1982


The Folk Art Tradition

Naïve Painting in Europe and the United States

November 17, 1981 - January 9, 1982


Austria's Expressionism

April 21, 1981 - May 30, 1981


Eugène Mihaesco

His First American One-Man Show

March 3, 1981 - April 11, 1981


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele

November 12, 1980 - December 27, 1980


Summer Exhibition

June 17, 1980 - October 31, 1980


Kollwitz: The Drawing and The Print

May 1, 1980 - June 10, 1980


40th Anniversary Exhibition

November 13, 1979 - December 28, 1979


American Primitive Art

November 22, 1977


Käthe Kollwitz

December 1, 1976


Neue Galerie-Galerie St. Etienne

A Documentary Exhibition

May 1, 1976


Martin Pajeck

January 27, 1976


Georges Rouault and Frans Masereel

April 29, 1972


Branko Paradis

December 1, 1971


Käthe Kollwitz

February 3, 1971


Egon Schiele

The Graphic Work

October 19, 1970


Gustav Klimt

March 20, 1970


Friedrich Hundertwasser

May 6, 1969


Austrian Art of the 20th Century

March 21, 1969


Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

October 31, 1968


Yugoslav Primitive Art

April 30, 1968


Alfred Kubin

January 30, 1968


Käthe Kollwitz

In the Cause of Humanity

October 23, 1967


Abraham Levin

September 26, 1967


Karl Stark

April 5, 1967


Gustav Klimt

February 4, 1967


The Wiener Werkstätte

November 16, 1966


Oskar Laske

October 25, 1965


Käthe Kollwitz

May 1, 1965


Egon Schiele

Watercolors and Drawings from American Collections

March 1, 1965


25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part II

November 21, 1964


25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

October 17, 1964


Mary Urban

June 9, 1964


Werner Berg, Jane Muus and Mura Dehn

May 5, 1964


Eugen Spiro

April 4, 1964


B. F. Dolbin

Drawings of an Epoch

March 3, 1964


Austrian Expressionists

January 6, 1964


Joseph Rifesser

December 3, 1963


Panorama of Yugoslav Primitive Art

October 21, 1963


Joe Henry

Watercolors of Vermont

May 1, 1963


French Impressionists

March 8, 1963


Grandma Moses

Memorial Exhibition

November 26, 1962


Group Show

October 15, 1962


Ernst Barlach

March 23, 1962


Martin Pajeck

February 24, 1962


Paintings by Expressionists

January 27, 1962


Käthe Kollwitz

November 11, 1961


Grandma Moses

September 7, 1961


My Friends

Fourth Biennial of Pictures by American School Children

May 27, 1961


Raimonds Staprans

April 17, 1961


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka and Alfred Kubin

March 14, 1961


Marvin Meisels

January 23, 1961


Egon Schiele

November 15, 1960


My Life's History

Paintings by Grandma Moses

September 12, 1960


Watercolors and Drawings by Austrian Artists from the Dial Collection

May 2, 1960


Martin Pajeck

February 29, 1960


Eugen Spiro

February 6, 1960


Käthe Kollwitz

December 14, 1959


Josef Scharl

Last Paintings and Drawings

November 11, 1959


European and American Expressionists

September 22, 1959


Our Town

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

May 23, 1959


Marvin Meisels and Martin Pajeck

May 1, 1959


Gustav Klimt

April 1, 1959


Käthe Kollwitz

January 12, 1959


Oskar Kokoschka

October 28, 1958


Village Life in Guatemala

Paintings by Andres Curuchich

June 3, 1958


Two Unknown American Expressionists

Paintings by Marvin Meisels and Martin Pajeck

April 28, 1958


Paula Modersohn-Becker

March 15, 1958


The Great Tradition in American Painting

American Primitive Art

January 20, 1958


Jules Lefranc and Dominique Lagru

Two French Primitives

November 18, 1957


Margret Bilger

October 22, 1957


The Four Seasons

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

June 11, 1957


Grandma Moses

May 6, 1957


Alfred Kubin

April 3, 1957


Franz Lerch

March 2, 1957


Egon Schiele

January 21, 1957


Josef Scharl

Memorial Exhibition

November 17, 1956


Irma Rothstein

May 19, 1956


Käthe Kollwitz

April 16, 1956


A Tribute to Grandma Moses

November 28, 1955


As I See Myself

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

May 20, 1955


Juan De'Prey

April 19, 1955


Erich Heckel

March 29, 1955


Freddy Homburger

March 2, 1955


Masters of the 19th Century

January 18, 1955


Oskar Kokoschka

November 29, 1954


Isabel Case Borgatta and Josef Scharl

October 12, 1954


James N. Rosenberg and Eugen Spiro

April 30, 1954


Per Krogh

April 2, 1954


Cuno Amiet

February 16, 1954


Eniar Jolin

January 14, 1954


Irma Rothstein

December 8, 1953


Josef Scharl

November 11, 1953


Grandma Moses

October 21, 1953 - October 24, 1953


Wilhelm Kaufmann

September 30, 1953


Lovis Corinth, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele

May 27, 1953


A Grandma Moses Album

Recent Paintings, 1950-1953

April 15, 1953


Streeter Blair

American Primitive

February 26, 1953


Paintings on Glass

Austrian Religious Folk Art of the 17th to 19th Centuries

December 4, 1952


Hasan Kaptan

Paintings of a Ten-Year-Old Turkish Painter

October 29, 1952


Margret Bilger

May 10, 1952


American Natural Painters

March 31, 1952


Ten Years of New York Concert Impressions by Eugen Spiro; Four New Paintings by

January 26, 1952


I-Fa-Wei

Watercolors of New York by a Chinese Artist

December 1, 1951


Käthe Kollwitz

October 25, 1951


Drawings and Watercolors by Austrian Children

May 21, 1951


Grandma Moses

Twenty-Five Masterpieces of Primitive Art

March 17, 1951


Roswitha Bitterlich

January 18, 1951


Oskar Laske

Watercolors of Vienna and the Salzkammergut

October 14, 1950


Tenth Anniversary Exhibition

Part II

May 11, 1950


Austrian Art of the 19th Century

From Wadlmüller to Klimt

April 1, 1950


Chiao Ssu-Tu

February 18, 1950


Anton Faistauer

January 1, 1950


Tenth Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

November 30, 1949


Autograph Exhibition

October 26, 1949


Gladys Wertheim Bachrach

May 24, 1949


Oskar Kokoschka

March 30, 1949


Eugen Spiro

February 19, 1949


Frans Masereel

January 13, 1949


Ten Years Grandma Moses

November 22, 1948


Käthe Kollwitz

Masterworks

October 18, 1948


American Primitives

June 3, 1948


Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

April 5, 1948


Miriam Richman

February 7, 1948


Vally Wieselthier

Memorial Exhibition

January 10, 1948


Christmas Exhibition

December 4, 1947


Fritz von Unruh

November 10, 1947


Käthe Kollwitz

October 4, 1947


Grandma Moses

May 17, 1947


Lovis Corinth

April 16, 1947


Hugo Steiner-Prag

March 15, 1947


Mark Baum

January 11, 1947


Eugen Spiro

November 25, 1946


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

May 17, 1946


Ladis W. Sabo

Paintings by a New Primitive Artist

April 8, 1946


Georges Rouault

The Graphic Work

February 26, 1946


Käthe Kollwitz

Memorial Exhibition

November 21, 1945


Fred E. Robertson

Paintings by an American Primitive

June 13, 1945


Max Liebermann

The Graphic Work

April 18, 1945


Vienna through Four Centuries

March 1, 1945


Eugen Spiro

January 20, 1945


Grandma Moses

New Paintings

December 5, 1944


Käthe Kollwitz

Part II

October 26, 1944


A Century of French Graphic Art

From Géricault to Picasso

September 28, 1944


Max Liebermann

Memorial Exhibition

June 9, 1944


Juan De'Prey

Paintings by a Self-Taught Artist from Puerto Rico

May 6, 1944


Abraham Levin

April 15, 1944


Lesser Ury

Memorial Exhibition

March 21, 1944


Grandma Moses

Paintings by the Senior of the American Primitives

February 9, 1944


Betty Lane

January 11, 1944


WaIt Disney Cavalcade

December 9, 1943


Käthe Kollwitz

Part I

November 3, 1943


Will Barnet

September 29, 1943


Lovis Corinth

May 26, 1943


Josephine Joy

Paintings by an American Primitive

May 3, 1943


Oskar Kokoschka

Aspects of His Art

March 31, 1943


Eugen Spiro

February 13, 1943


Seymour Lipton

January 18, 1943


Illuminated Gothic Woodcuts

Printed and Painted, 1477-1493

December 5, 1942


Abraham Levin

November 4, 1942


Walt Disney Originals

September 23, 1942


Documents which Relate History

Documents of Historical Importance and Landmarks of Human Development

June 10, 1942


Honoré Daumier

April 29, 1942


Bertha Trabich

Memorial Exhibition of a Russian-American Primitive

March 25, 1942


Alfred Kubin

Master of Drawing

December 4, 1941


Egon Schiele

November 7, 1941


Betty Lane

June 3, 1941


Flowers from Old Vienna

18th and Early 19th Century Flower Painting

May 7, 1941


Weavings by Navaho and Hopi Indians and Photos of Indians by Helen M. Post

January 29, 1941


Georg Merkel

November 7, 1940


What a Farm Wife Painted

Works by Mrs. Anna Mary Moses

October 9, 1940


Saved from Europe

Masterpieces of European Art

July 1, 1940


American Abstract Art

May 22, 1940


Franz Lerch

May 1, 1940


Wilhelm Thöny

April 3, 1940


French Masters of the 19th and 20th Centuries

February 29, 1940


H. W. Hannau

Metropolis, Photographic Studies of New York

February 2, 1940


Oskar Kokoschka

January 9, 1940


Austrian Masters

November 13, 1939


WORKERS OF THE WORLD

Modern Images of Labor

April 2, 2002 - June 15, 2002

ARTISTS

Arntz, Gerd

Coe, Sue

Daumier, Honoré

Evergood, Philip

Felixmüller, Conrad

Gropper, William

Grosz, George

Grundig, Lea

Hasse, Sella

Heartfield, John

Jansen, Franz M.

Klutsis, Gustav

Kollwitz, Käthe

Liebermann, Max

Masereel, Franz

Millet, Jean François

Overbeck-Schenk, Gerta

Rivera, Diego

Schmitz, Hans

Soyer, Raphael

Tschinkel, Augustin

ESSAY

Although work is a central fact of life, its popularity as an artistic subject has waxed and waned over the course of the past 150 years. Not surprisingly, labor first seriously began to interest a broad spectrum of European artists following the Revolution of 1848. Workers had appeared sporadically in art prior to the nineteenth century (particularly in Northern Europe), but they usually played minor roles. With the Church and the aristocracy as their principal patrons, artists for the most part painted portraits of the upper class or grand themes from religion and history. However, the rise of bourgeois capitalism not only altered the terms of artistic patronage, but also generated social and political upheavals that artists felt compelled to address. After the 1848 Revolution, laborers came to embody the nascent spirit of democracy and to constitute, for the first time, a primary subject for major paintings and sculpture.

 

Though most artists were born into—and supported by—the middle class, the turn to proletarian subjects was often a protest against the inequities of modern bourgeois society. Realism, the dominant style of the period throughout Europe, was likewise a protest against the falsifying idealizations of the past, part of a quest for literal “truth” that paralleled the scientific explorations of the period. Artists sought to represent contemporary life honestly, in all its aspects, and the worker was seen as the quintessential modern subject. Even those artists who were not overtly political bowed to an egalitarian spirit that commanded them to accord all social strata equal attention and dignity.

 

Despite artists’ shared allegiance to realistic truth telling, the images of labor that emanated from late nineteenth-century Europe reveal a variety of stylistic and sociological orientations. Honoré Daumier, with a relatively light touch, used caricature to deflate bourgeois pretensions. Jean-François Millet’s romantic depictions of toiling peasants championed a seemingly timeless connection to the soil at the very moment when rural folkways were rapidly being overtaken by industrialization. Adolph von Menzel’s factory workers are similarly ennobled by grueling physical labor, though they, too, may soon be replaced by machines. Käthe Kollwitz, on the other hand, did not see work as ennobling. Her peasants are depicted as brutalized, exploited animals, and her urban workers are prey to abuse, poverty and unemployment. Though Kollwitz thought workers were intrinsically beautiful, right-wing critics reviled her choice of subject matter and her unvarnished approach.

 

The elevation of labor as an artistic subject in the second half of the nineteenth century reflected two key unifying concerns. The first of these concerns was a need to see art as inseparable from—and therefore accountable to—its social context. On a more personal level, many artists shared a desire to distance themselves from their middle-class milieu and to ally themselves with forces they found both nobler and more just. Liberal intellectuals saw themselves as a separate class of “brain workers” who had somehow transcended their bourgeois origins and therefore could lead the way toward a new, egalitarian era. However, such socially-oriented visions diminished with the advent of Symbolism and then modernism. Artists who engaged humanistic issues at the turn of the twentieth century were inclined to address them in idiosyncratic, individualized terms. Formulating a modern pictorial vocabulary may have been perceived by some as subversive, but most modernist pioneers were more concerned with aesthetics than with politics.

 

Nevertheless, early modernism encompassed an inchoate protest against bourgeois values that was only waiting to assume a political dimension. This pivotal transformation was wrought by World War I and its revolutionary aftermath. The sheer brutality and senselessness of the war forged a new bond between the artist-soldier and his working-class comrades-in-arms, while at the same time opening a chasm between the fighting masses and the wealthy capitalists who had cravenly sent them to the slaughter. The privations of war generated the proletarian alliance necessary to topple the Russian Czar in 1917, and when the German regime fell a year later, it was widely assumed that a Communist revolution would follow. In both the U.S.S.R. and Germany, many avant-garde artists rallied to the socialist cause.

 

Artists initially sought to remake art according to Marxist principles, assuming that the proletariat would naturally respond. This creative enterprise entailed a number of sometimes overlapping theoretical formulations. Almost everywhere, socialist artists were committed to print: posters were handy to get out the word, and multiples countermanded the bourgeois preciousness of the unique art object. Stylistically, too, artists sought to create work that eschewed all signs of individuality. In Cologne, the Group of Progressive Artists, whose members included Gerd Arntz, Hans Schmitz and Augustin Tschinkel, invented a visual language of flat, black pictographs. Revealing no trace of the artist’s touch, these easily read symbols transformed people into anonymous ciphers, defined only by their surroundings and the trappings of their professions. Photomontage, invented more or less simultaneously by George Grosz, John Heartfield, Raoul Hausmann and Hannah Höch in Germany, and by El Lissitzky and Gustav Klutsis in the U.S.S.R., was likewise seen as an impersonal, revolutionary artistic tool.

 

Notwithstanding the fervor with which German and Russian artists greeted the new political age, their ostensible alliance with the proletariat quickly broke down. From the pure abstractions of the Russian Constructivists to the Expressionistic and Dadaist distortions of the Germans, the avant-garde produced imagery that the masses found at best incomprehensible and at worst offensive. In the early 1920s, the Constructivists decided to turn their attention from art to the design of utilitarian objects. The Soviet regime, looking for a more accessible visual style, reverted to realism, which had previously been rejected on account of its bourgeois associations. Among all the new styles, only photomontage proved sufficiently intelligible to a broad, unsophisticated public. Unsullied by any retrograde connotations, this technique dominated the posters produced under Stalin in the late 1920s and ’30s.

 

As the Communist revolution took hold in Russia, the creation of visual propaganda was subjected to increasingly doctrinaire state control. Solidifying support for the new government, after the bloody post-revolutionary civil war had been won by the Reds, demanded an outpouring of sunny images. Farmers and industrial workers were portrayed in nothing less than heroic terms, and Soviet production was effusively extolled. In Germany, where the entrenched capitalist faction was forcefully reasserting itself, left-wing artists painted a much bleaker picture. Grosz, Lea Grundig, Kollwitz and others catalogued the rampant injustices of the reigning social order, depicting German workers as pitiful, downtrodden victims. Increasingly, this attitude was frowned upon by Moscow, which deplored both the negativism and the creative independence of their German comrades.

 

Beyond the thorny issue of artistic freedom under Communism lay the equally touchy (but less often discussed) matter of artists’ primary class allegiances. The nineteenth-century ideal of the artist as a special class of “brain worker” found some echo in early Soviet cultural policy. Leon Trotsky, one of Lenin’s close collaborators, viewed artists as a kind of worker elite: manual laborers who, because of their talent and training, might qualify as inspirational leaders. This was the viewpoint adopted by Trotsky’s friend, the Mexican artist Diego Rivera. Rivera was one of a number of muralists employed by the Mexican government in the early 1920s to proselytize on behalf of the recent revolution. After the Mexican government took a reactionary turn in 1924, many of these artists looked to the United States for commissions. Although Rivera did not abandon his leftist leanings, his subsequent work for clients such as the Ford Motor Company and the Rockefellers highlights the difficulty that artists in a capitalist society had sustaining an ideologically pristine identification with the proletariat.

 

On the other hand, the fact that capitalists such as Ford and Rockefeller would hire a Communist like Rivera in the first place highlights the manner in which America’s democratic populism softened the European concept of class conflict. Because the U.S. lacks an aristocratic tradition, social distinctions are defined by what is perceived as a flexible continuum of wealth, rather than by rigid class boundaries. Whereas the European bourgeoisie has been widely reviled, the American middle class is the group that U.S. citizens, rich and poor, most readily identify with. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, labor became a national preoccupation, and workers were seen as heroic symbols of patriotic unity. Take away the Marxist references, and a Communist mural easily became a paean to American capitalism.

 

One of the most successful meldings of artist and worker occurred in Depression-era America. The collapse of the American economy after the stock market crash of 1929 destroyed, in one fell swoop, much of the capitalist infrastructure that had previously sustained an insular art world. Suddenly no different from other unemployed workers, artists became instantly politicized. The specific hardships engendered by the Depression merged with a more generalized desire to reform the injustices believed to be inherent in the capitalist system. Many artists rallied to the cause of Proletarianism, the Americanized version of Communism. And just as artists now saw themselves as workers, so workers were seen as potential artists. The Marxist periodical New Masses encouraged laborers to engage in all manner of creative enterprises and ran a regular column headlined “Workers’ Art.”

 

The art community’s socially oriented position helped shape the various art programs run by the U.S. government in the 1930s under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration. Partly because the artists themselves demanded it, the Roosevelt administration treated them like common laborers, assigning them to projects that paid hourly wages, in addition to doling out more conventional commissions. The W.P.A. also literally brought art to the people, both by dispatching commissioned artists throughout the country, and by establishing Community Art Centers to hold art classes and host exhibitions. Many of the more politically radical American artists of the early ‘30s—including Philip Evergood, William Gropper and Ben Shahn—painted murals for the W.P.A.

 

Like the Mexican, Russian and German regimes, the Roosevelt administration discovered that art is a powerful social tool. Public commissions could be used to cement national identity, and posters hailed the success of the government’s various programs. As in Europe, it became evident that a realist style worked best. Photomontage, employed by Lester Beall in his posters for the Rural Electrification Administration, also proved a popular success. And straight abstraction, it turned out, was better tolerated than the realist distortions perpetrated by the Expressionists and the Surrealists. As the decade of the 1930s wore on, artistic styles began to acquire specific political connotations. The fact that both Stalin and Hitler detested modernism lent its adherents increased moral weight. On the other hand, the socially conscious realism practiced by many W.P.A. artists, steeped as they were in early ‘30s radicalism, acquired a Communist taint.

 

The apotheosis of modernism as America’s national aesthetic credo was completed after World War II.

 

Granted, there were some right-wing congressmen who (not incorrectly) identified modern art with prewar European socialism. In order to become politically acceptable, modernism had to be Americanized—as it was through the cowboy persona of Jackson Pollock—and stripped of all ideological associations. American proponents of “art for art’s sake” lauded abstraction as the antithesis of Nazi and Soviet propaganda. Because it was ostensibly content-free, abstract art proved an ideal repository for the projected values of democratic freedom and ultimately became a cornerstone of America’s Cold-War-era cultural policy. Though Pop Art in the 1960s reintroduced representational subject matter, modernism never again directly engaged social realities in the manner that was common, both in Europe and the U.S., before World War II. The capitalist system had recovered from the Depression, the insular art world had re-established itself, and most artists were content to go back to serving the upper classes. Sue Coe has been one of the few contemporary artists to maintain a concerted activist stance. Labor has figured prominently in her work, while fading from view on the larger art scene.

 

The dogma of “art for art’s sake” notwithstanding, however, art is seldom politically inert. During the period of social upheaval and crisis that stretched from the mid-nineteenth- to the mid-twentieth centuries, avant-garde artists routinely abandoned their bourgeois class allegiances to identify with the proletariat, in the hopes that a united front would yield a more just world. Artists recognized the potential power of their work, and governments responded accordingly, viewing art either as a means of asserting control, or as a destabilizing threat. Depoliticizing art was one way of neutralizing its disruptive capabilities. But as the American State Department’s use of abstraction during the Cold War demonstrates, even supposedly apolitical art can serve political ends. Although artists throughout history have usually worked for the rich, this does not mean that art is merely a dispensable luxury good. The economic and social ramifications of art are considerable, even (or perhaps especially) when these ramifications are being fervently denied. The stark dwindling of the worker as a subject for contemporary art—at a time when globalization is transforming the labor market at home and abroad—speaks volumes about the level of denial that is necessary to sustain our current socio-economic order.

 

We would like to convey our heartfelt thanks to the many colleagues and friends who contributed works to this exhibition. Special mention must be made of Andrew Breslau, who first called our attention to Giacomo Patri’s classic picture novel, White Collar, and to the artist’s son, Piero Patri. White Collar, a Depression-era attempt to dramatize the common interests shared by white- and blue-collar workers, served as the inspiration for the present exhibition. We would also like to thank Merrill Berman, who was as ever extremely generous with his advice. Checklist entries include catalogue raisonné numbers, where applicable. Unless otherwise indicated, image dimensions are given for the prints and full dimensions for the posters and all other works.