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Past Exhibitions

The Woman Question

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka

March 14, 2017 - June 30, 2017


You Say You Want a Revolution

American Artists and the Communist Party

October 18, 2016 - March 4, 2017


Recent Acquisitions

July 12, 2016 - October 7, 2016


Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Featuring Watercolors and Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection

March 29, 2016 - July 1, 2016


Paula Modersohn-Becker

Art and Life

November 3, 2015 - March 19, 2016


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 21, 2015 - October 16, 2015


Leonard Baskin

Wunderkammer

April 23, 2015 - July 2, 2015


Alternate Histories

Celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

January 15, 2015 - April 11, 2015


Marie-Louise Motesiczky

The Mother Paintings

October 7, 2014 - December 24, 2014


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 15, 2014 - September 26, 2014


Ilija/Mangelos

Father & Son, Inside & Out

April 24, 2014 - July 3, 2014


Modern Furies

The Lessons and Legacy of World War I

January 21, 2014 - April 12, 2014


Käthe Kollwitz

The Complete Print Cycles

October 8, 2013 - December 28, 2013


Käthe Kollwitz

The Complete Print Cycles

October 8, 2013 - December 28, 2013


Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

July 9, 2013 - September 27, 2013


Face Time

Self and Identity in Expressionist Portraiture

April 9, 2013 - June 28, 2013


Story Lines

Tracing the Narrative of "Outsider" Art

January 15, 2013 - March 30, 2013


Egon Schiele's Women

October 23, 2012 - December 28, 2012


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 17, 2012 - October 13, 2012


Mad As Hell!

New Work (and Some Classics) by Sue Coe

April 17, 2012 - July 3, 2012


The Ins and Outs of Self-Taught Art

Reflections on a Shifting Field

January 10, 2012 - April 7, 2012


The Lady and the Tramp

Images of Women in Austrian and German Art

October 11, 2011 - December 30, 2011


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 5, 2011 - September 30, 2011


Decadence & Decay

Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, George Grosz

April 12, 2011 - June 24, 2011


Self-Taught Painters in American 1800-1950

Revisiting the Tradition

January 11, 2011 - April 2, 2011


Marie-Louise Motesiczky

Paradise Lost & Found

October 12, 2010 - December 30, 2010


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 13, 2010 - October 1, 2010


Käthe Kollwitz

A Portrait of the Artist

April 13, 2010 - June 25, 2010


Seventy Years Grandma Moses

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Artist's "Discovery"

February 3, 2010 - April 3, 2010


Egon Schiele as Printmaker

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 3, 2009 - January 23, 2010


From Brücke To Bauhaus

The Meanings of Modernity in Germany, 1905-1933

March 31, 2009 - June 26, 2009


They Taught Themselves

American Self-Taught Painters Between the World Wars

January 9, 2009 - March 14, 2009


Elephants We Must Never Forget

New Paintings Drawings and Prints by Sue Coe

October 14, 2008 - December 20, 2008


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2008 - September 26, 2008


Hope or Menace?

Communism in Germany Between the World Wars

March 25, 2008 - June 13, 2008


Transforming Reality

Pattern and Design in Modern and Self-Taught Art

January 15, 2008 - March 8, 2008


Leonard Baskin

Proofs and Process

October 9, 2007 - January 5, 2008


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 5, 2007 - September 28, 2007


Who Paid the Piper?

The Art of Patronage in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna

March 8, 2007 - May 26, 2007


Fairy Tale, Myth and Fantasy

Approaches to Spirituality in Art

December 7, 2006 - February 3, 2007


More Than Coffee was Served

Café Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna and Weimar Germany

September 19, 2006 - November 25, 2006


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 6, 2006 - September 8, 2006


Parallel Visions II

"Outsider" and "Insider" Art Today

April 5, 2006 - May 26, 2006


Ilija!

His First American Exhibtion

January 17, 2006 - March 18, 2006


Coming of Age

Egon Schiele and the Modernist Culture of Youth

November 15, 2005 - January 7, 2006


Sue Coe:

Sheep of Fools

September 20, 2005 - November 5, 2005


Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

June 7, 2005 - September 9, 2005


Every Picture Tells a Story

The Narrative Impulse in Modern and Contemporary Art

April 5, 2005 - May 27, 2005


65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part II

Self-Taught Artists

January 18, 2005 - March 26, 2005


65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part I

Austrian and German Expressionism

October 28, 2004 - January 8, 2005


Sue Coe: Bully: Master of the Global Merry-Go-Round and Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 8, 2004 - October 16, 2004


Animals & Us

The Animal in Contemporary Art

April 1, 2004 - May 22, 2004


Henry Darger

Art and Myth

January 15, 2004 - March 20, 2004


Body and Soul

Expressionism and the Human Figure

October 7, 2003 - January 3, 2004


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2003 - September 12, 2003


In Search of the "Total Artwork"

Viennese Art and Design 1897–1932

April 8, 2003 - June 14, 2003


Russia's Self-Taught Artists

A New Perspective on the "Outsider"

January 14, 2003 - March 29, 2003


Käthe Kollwitz:

Master Printmaker

October 1, 2002 - January 4, 2003


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 25, 2002 - September 20, 2002


Workers of the World

Modern Images of Labor

April 2, 2002 - June 15, 2002


Grandma Moses

Reflections of America

January 15, 2002 - March 16, 2002


Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoscha

From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

November 23, 2001 - January 5, 2002


The "Black-and-White" Show

Expressionist Graphics in Austria & Germany

September 20, 2001 - November 10, 2001


Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 26, 2001 - September 7, 2001


Art with an Agenda

Politics, Persuasion, Illustration and Decoration

April 10, 2001 - June 16, 2001


"Our Beautiful and Tormented Austria!": Art Brut in the Land of Freud

January 18, 2001 - March 17, 2001


The Tragedy of War

November 16, 2000 - January 6, 2001


The Expressionist City

September 19, 2000 - November 4, 2000


Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 20, 2000 - September 8, 2000


From Façade to Psyche

Turn-of-the-Century Portraiture in Austria & Germany

March 28, 2000 - June 10, 2000


European Self-Taught Art

Brut or Naive?

January 18, 2000 - March 11, 2000


Saved From Europe

In Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 6, 1999 - January 8, 2000


The Modern Child

(Images of Children in Twentieth-Century Art)

September 14, 1999 - November 6, 1999


Recent Acquisitions

(And a Look at Sixty Years of Art Dealing)

June 15, 1999 - September 3, 1999


Sue Coe: The Pit

The Tragical Tale of the Rise and Fall of a Vivisector

March 30, 1999 - June 5, 1999


Henry Darger and His Realms

January 14, 1999 - March 13, 1999


Becoming Käthe Kollwitz

An Artist and Her Influences

November 17, 1998 - December 31, 1998


George Grosz - Elfriede Lohse-Wächtler

Art & Gender in Weimar Germany

September 23, 1998 - November 11, 1998


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts About Looted Art)

June 9, 1998 - September 11, 1998


Taboo

Repression and Revolt in Modern Art

March 26, 1998 - May 30, 1998


Sacred & Profane

Michel Nedjar and Expressionist Primitivism

January 13, 1998 - March 14, 1998


Egon Schiele (1890-1918)

Master Draughtsman

November 18, 1997 - January 3, 1998


The New Objectivity

Realism in Weimar-Era Germany

September 16, 1997 - November 8, 1997


Recent Acquisitions

A Question of Quality

June 10, 1997 - September 5, 1997


Käthe Kollwitz - Lea Grundig

Two German Women & The Art of Protest

March 25, 1997 - May 31, 1997


That Way Madness Lies

Expressionism and the Art of Gugging

January 14, 1997 - March 15, 1997


The Viennese Line

Art and Design Circa 1900

November 18, 1996 - January 4, 1997


Emil Nolde - Christian Rohlfs

Two German Expressionist Masters

September 24, 1996 - November 9, 1996


Breaking All The Rules

Art in Transition

June 11, 1996 - September 6, 1996


Sue Coe's Ship of Fools

March 26, 1996 - May 24, 1996


New York Folk

Lawrence Lebduska, Abraham Levin, Isreal Litwak

January 16, 1996 - March 16, 1996


The Fractured Form

Expressionism and the Human Body

November 15, 1995 - January 6, 1996


From Left to Right

Social Realism in Germany and Russia, Circa 1919-1933

September 19, 1995 - November 4, 1995


Recent Acquisitions

June 20, 1995 - September 8, 1995


On the Brink 1900-2000

The Turning of Two Centuries

March 28, 1995 - May 26, 1995


Earl Cummingham - Grandma Moses

Visions of America

January 17, 1995 - March 18, 1995


Three Berlin Artists of the Weimar Era: Hannah Höch, Käthe Kollwitz, Jeanne Mam

September 13, 1994 - November 5, 1994


55th Anniversary Exhibition in Memory of Otto Kallir

June 7, 1994 - September 2, 1994


Drawn to Text: Comix Artists as Book Illustrators

May 15, 1994 - January 7, 1995


Sue Coe: We All Fall Down

March 29, 1994 - May 27, 1994


The Forgotten Folk Art of the 1940's

January 18, 1994 - March 19, 1994


Symbolism and the Austrian Avant Garde

Klimt, Schiele and their Contemporaries

November 16, 1993 - January 8, 1994


Art and Politics in Weimar Germany

September 14, 1993 - November 6, 1993


Recent Acquisitions

June 8, 1993 - September 3, 1993


The "Outsider" Question

Non-Academic Art from 1900 to the Present

March 23, 1993 - May 28, 1993


The Dance of Death

Images of Mortality in German Art

January 19, 1993 - March 13, 1993


Art Spiegelman

The Road to Maus

November 17, 1992 - January 9, 1993


Käthe Kollwitz

In Celebration of the 125th Anniversary of the Artist's Birth

September 15, 1992 - November 7, 1992


Naive Visions/Art Nouveau and Expressionism/Sue Coe: The Road to the White House

May 19, 1992 - September 4, 1992


Richard Gerstl/Oskar Kokoschka

March 17, 1992 - May 9, 1992


Scandal, Outrage, Censorship

Controversy in Modern Art

January 21, 1992 - March 7, 1992


Viennese Graphic Design

From Secession to Expressionism

November 19, 1991 - January 11, 1992


The Expressionist Figure

September 10, 1991 - November 9, 1991


Recent Acquisitions

Themes and Variations

May 14, 1991 - August 16, 1991


Sue Coe Retrospective

Political Document of a Decade

March 12, 1991 - May 5, 1991


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, drawings and prints

January 22, 1991 - March 2, 1991


Egon Schiele

November 13, 1990 - January 12, 1991


Lovis Corinth

A Retrospective

September 11, 1990 - November 3, 1990


Recent Acquisitions

June 12, 1990 - August 31, 1990


Max Klinger, Käthe Kollwitz, Alfred Kubin

A Study in Influences

March 27, 1990 - June 2, 1990


The Narrative in Art

January 23, 1990 - March 17, 1990


Grandma Moses

November 14, 1989 - January 13, 1990


Sue Coe

Porkopolis--Animals and Industry

September 19, 1989 - November 4, 1989


Galerie St. Etienne

A History in Documents and Pictures

June 20, 1989 - September 8, 1989


Gustav Klimt

Paintings and Drawings

April 11, 1989 - June 10, 1989


Fifty Years Galerie St. Etienne: An Overview

February 14, 1989 - April 1, 1989


Folk Artists at Work

Morris Hirshfield, John Kane and Grandma Moses

November 15, 1988 - January 14, 1989


Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

June 14, 1988 - September 16, 1988


From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

April 12, 1988 - May 27, 1988


Three Pre-Expressionists

Lovis Corinth Käthe Kollwitz Paula Modersohn-Becker

January 26, 1988 - March 12, 1988


Käthe Kollwitz

The Power of the Print

November 17, 1987 - January 16, 1988


Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

April 7, 1987 - October 31, 1987


Folk Art of This Century

February 10, 1987 - March 28, 1987


Oskar Kokoschka and His Time

November 25, 1986 - January 31, 1987


Viennese Design and Wiener Werkstätte

September 23, 1986 - November 8, 1986


Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, Drawings and Prints

May 27, 1986 - September 13, 1986


Expressionist Painters

March 25, 1986 - May 10, 1986


Käthe Kollwitz/Paula Modersohn-Becker

January 28, 1986 - March 15, 1986


The Art of Giving

December 3, 1985 - January 18, 1986


Expressionists on Paper

October 8, 1985 - November 23, 1985


European and American Landscapes

June 4, 1985 - September 13, 1985


Expressionist Printmaking

Aspects of its Genesis and Development

April 1, 1985 - May 24, 1985


Expressionist Masters

January 18, 1985 - March 23, 1985


Arnold Schoenberg's Vienna

November 13, 1984 - January 5, 1985


Grandma Moses and Selected Folk Paintings

September 25, 1984 - November 3, 1984


American Folk Art

People, Places and Things

June 12, 1984 - September 14, 1984


John Kane

Modern America's First Folk Painter

April 17, 1984 - May 25, 1984


Eugène Mihaesco

The Illustrator as Artist

February 28, 1984 - April 7, 1984


Early Expressionist Masters

January 17, 1984 - February 18, 1984


Paula Modersohn-Becker

Germany's Pioneer Modernist

November 15, 1983 - January 7, 1984


Gustav Klimt

Drawings and Selected Paintings

September 20, 1983 - November 5, 1983


Early and Late

Drawings, Paintings & Prints from Academicism to Expressionism

June 1, 1983 - September 2, 1983


Alfred Kubin

Visions From The Other Side

March 22, 1983 - May 7, 1983


20th Century Folk

The First Generation

January 18, 1983 - March 12, 1983


Grandma Moses

The Artist Behind the Myth

November 15, 1982 - January 8, 1983


Kollwitz

The Artist as Printmaker

September 28, 1982 - November 6, 1982


Aspects of Modernism

June 1, 1982 - September 3, 1982


The Human Perspective

Recent Acquisitions

March 16, 1982 - May 15, 1982


19th and 20th Century European and American Folk Art

January 19, 1982 - March 6, 1982


The Folk Art Tradition

Naïve Painting in Europe and the United States

November 17, 1981 - January 9, 1982


Austria's Expressionism

April 21, 1981 - May 30, 1981


Eugène Mihaesco

His First American One-Man Show

March 3, 1981 - April 11, 1981


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele

November 12, 1980 - December 27, 1980


Summer Exhibition

June 17, 1980 - October 31, 1980


Kollwitz: The Drawing and The Print

May 1, 1980 - June 10, 1980


40th Anniversary Exhibition

November 13, 1979 - December 28, 1979


American Primitive Art

November 22, 1977


Käthe Kollwitz

December 1, 1976


Neue Galerie-Galerie St. Etienne

A Documentary Exhibition

May 1, 1976


Martin Pajeck

January 27, 1976


Georges Rouault and Frans Masereel

April 29, 1972


Branko Paradis

December 1, 1971


Käthe Kollwitz

February 3, 1971


Egon Schiele

The Graphic Work

October 19, 1970


Gustav Klimt

March 20, 1970


Friedrich Hundertwasser

May 6, 1969


Austrian Art of the 20th Century

March 21, 1969


Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

October 31, 1968


Yugoslav Primitive Art

April 30, 1968


Alfred Kubin

January 30, 1968


Käthe Kollwitz

In the Cause of Humanity

October 23, 1967


Abraham Levin

September 26, 1967


Karl Stark

April 5, 1967


Gustav Klimt

February 4, 1967


The Wiener Werkstätte

November 16, 1966


Oskar Laske

October 25, 1965


Käthe Kollwitz

May 1, 1965


Egon Schiele

Watercolors and Drawings from American Collections

March 1, 1965


25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part II

November 21, 1964


25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

October 17, 1964


Mary Urban

June 9, 1964


Werner Berg, Jane Muus and Mura Dehn

May 5, 1964


Eugen Spiro

April 4, 1964


B. F. Dolbin

Drawings of an Epoch

March 3, 1964


Austrian Expressionists

January 6, 1964


Joseph Rifesser

December 3, 1963


Panorama of Yugoslav Primitive Art

October 21, 1963


Joe Henry

Watercolors of Vermont

May 1, 1963


French Impressionists

March 8, 1963


Grandma Moses

Memorial Exhibition

November 26, 1962


Group Show

October 15, 1962


Ernst Barlach

March 23, 1962


Martin Pajeck

February 24, 1962


Paintings by Expressionists

January 27, 1962


Käthe Kollwitz

November 11, 1961


Grandma Moses

September 7, 1961


My Friends

Fourth Biennial of Pictures by American School Children

May 27, 1961


Raimonds Staprans

April 17, 1961


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka and Alfred Kubin

March 14, 1961


Marvin Meisels

January 23, 1961


Egon Schiele

November 15, 1960


My Life's History

Paintings by Grandma Moses

September 12, 1960


Watercolors and Drawings by Austrian Artists from the Dial Collection

May 2, 1960


Martin Pajeck

February 29, 1960


Eugen Spiro

February 6, 1960


Käthe Kollwitz

December 14, 1959


Josef Scharl

Last Paintings and Drawings

November 11, 1959


European and American Expressionists

September 22, 1959


Our Town

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

May 23, 1959


Marvin Meisels and Martin Pajeck

May 1, 1959


Gustav Klimt

April 1, 1959


Käthe Kollwitz

January 12, 1959


Oskar Kokoschka

October 28, 1958


Village Life in Guatemala

Paintings by Andres Curuchich

June 3, 1958


Two Unknown American Expressionists

Paintings by Marvin Meisels and Martin Pajeck

April 28, 1958


Paula Modersohn-Becker

March 15, 1958


The Great Tradition in American Painting

American Primitive Art

January 20, 1958


Jules Lefranc and Dominique Lagru

Two French Primitives

November 18, 1957


Margret Bilger

October 22, 1957


The Four Seasons

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

June 11, 1957


Grandma Moses

May 6, 1957


Alfred Kubin

April 3, 1957


Franz Lerch

March 2, 1957


Egon Schiele

January 21, 1957


Josef Scharl

Memorial Exhibition

November 17, 1956


Irma Rothstein

May 19, 1956


Käthe Kollwitz

April 16, 1956


A Tribute to Grandma Moses

November 28, 1955


As I See Myself

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

May 20, 1955


Juan De'Prey

April 19, 1955


Erich Heckel

March 29, 1955


Freddy Homburger

March 2, 1955


Masters of the 19th Century

January 18, 1955


Oskar Kokoschka

November 29, 1954


Isabel Case Borgatta and Josef Scharl

October 12, 1954


James N. Rosenberg and Eugen Spiro

April 30, 1954


Per Krogh

April 2, 1954


Cuno Amiet

February 16, 1954


Eniar Jolin

January 14, 1954


Irma Rothstein

December 8, 1953


Josef Scharl

November 11, 1953


Grandma Moses

October 21, 1953 - October 24, 1953


Wilhelm Kaufmann

September 30, 1953


Lovis Corinth, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele

May 27, 1953


A Grandma Moses Album

Recent Paintings, 1950-1953

April 15, 1953


Streeter Blair

American Primitive

February 26, 1953


Paintings on Glass

Austrian Religious Folk Art of the 17th to 19th Centuries

December 4, 1952


Hasan Kaptan

Paintings of a Ten-Year-Old Turkish Painter

October 29, 1952


Margret Bilger

May 10, 1952


American Natural Painters

March 31, 1952


Ten Years of New York Concert Impressions by Eugen Spiro; Four New Paintings by

January 26, 1952


I-Fa-Wei

Watercolors of New York by a Chinese Artist

December 1, 1951


Käthe Kollwitz

October 25, 1951


Drawings and Watercolors by Austrian Children

May 21, 1951


Grandma Moses

Twenty-Five Masterpieces of Primitive Art

March 17, 1951


Roswitha Bitterlich

January 18, 1951


Oskar Laske

Watercolors of Vienna and the Salzkammergut

October 14, 1950


Tenth Anniversary Exhibition

Part II

May 11, 1950


Austrian Art of the 19th Century

From Wadlmüller to Klimt

April 1, 1950


Chiao Ssu-Tu

February 18, 1950


Anton Faistauer

January 1, 1950


Tenth Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

November 30, 1949


Autograph Exhibition

October 26, 1949


Gladys Wertheim Bachrach

May 24, 1949


Oskar Kokoschka

March 30, 1949


Eugen Spiro

February 19, 1949


Frans Masereel

January 13, 1949


Ten Years Grandma Moses

November 22, 1948


Käthe Kollwitz

Masterworks

October 18, 1948


American Primitives

June 3, 1948


Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

April 5, 1948


Miriam Richman

February 7, 1948


Vally Wieselthier

Memorial Exhibition

January 10, 1948


Christmas Exhibition

December 4, 1947


Fritz von Unruh

November 10, 1947


Käthe Kollwitz

October 4, 1947


Grandma Moses

May 17, 1947


Lovis Corinth

April 16, 1947


Hugo Steiner-Prag

March 15, 1947


Mark Baum

January 11, 1947


Eugen Spiro

November 25, 1946


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

May 17, 1946


Ladis W. Sabo

Paintings by a New Primitive Artist

April 8, 1946


Georges Rouault

The Graphic Work

February 26, 1946


Käthe Kollwitz

Memorial Exhibition

November 21, 1945


Fred E. Robertson

Paintings by an American Primitive

June 13, 1945


Max Liebermann

The Graphic Work

April 18, 1945


Vienna through Four Centuries

March 1, 1945


Eugen Spiro

January 20, 1945


Grandma Moses

New Paintings

December 5, 1944


Käthe Kollwitz

Part II

October 26, 1944


A Century of French Graphic Art

From Géricault to Picasso

September 28, 1944


Max Liebermann

Memorial Exhibition

June 9, 1944


Juan De'Prey

Paintings by a Self-Taught Artist from Puerto Rico

May 6, 1944


Abraham Levin

April 15, 1944


Lesser Ury

Memorial Exhibition

March 21, 1944


Grandma Moses

Paintings by the Senior of the American Primitives

February 9, 1944


Betty Lane

January 11, 1944


WaIt Disney Cavalcade

December 9, 1943


Käthe Kollwitz

Part I

November 3, 1943


Will Barnet

September 29, 1943


Lovis Corinth

May 26, 1943


Josephine Joy

Paintings by an American Primitive

May 3, 1943


Oskar Kokoschka

Aspects of His Art

March 31, 1943


Eugen Spiro

February 13, 1943


Seymour Lipton

January 18, 1943


Illuminated Gothic Woodcuts

Printed and Painted, 1477-1493

December 5, 1942


Abraham Levin

November 4, 1942


Walt Disney Originals

September 23, 1942


Documents which Relate History

Documents of Historical Importance and Landmarks of Human Development

June 10, 1942


Honoré Daumier

April 29, 1942


Bertha Trabich

Memorial Exhibition of a Russian-American Primitive

March 25, 1942


Alfred Kubin

Master of Drawing

December 4, 1941


Egon Schiele

November 7, 1941


Betty Lane

June 3, 1941


Flowers from Old Vienna

18th and Early 19th Century Flower Painting

May 7, 1941


Weavings by Navaho and Hopi Indians and Photos of Indians by Helen M. Post

January 29, 1941


Georg Merkel

November 7, 1940


What a Farm Wife Painted

Works by Mrs. Anna Mary Moses

October 9, 1940


Saved from Europe

Masterpieces of European Art

July 1, 1940


American Abstract Art

May 22, 1940


Franz Lerch

May 1, 1940


Wilhelm Thöny

April 3, 1940


French Masters of the 19th and 20th Centuries

February 29, 1940


H. W. Hannau

Metropolis, Photographic Studies of New York

February 2, 1940


Oskar Kokoschka

January 9, 1940


Austrian Masters

November 13, 1939


GRANDMA MOSES

Reflections of America

January 15, 2002 - March 16, 2002

ARTISTS

Moses, Anna Mary Robertson ("Grandma")

ESSAY

In October 1940, the Galerie St. Etienne presented an exhibition, titled simply “What a Farmwife Painted,” of work by an unknown self-taught artist named Anna Mary Robertson Moses. The gallery had been founded scarcely a year earlier by Otto Kallir, who had fled his native Austria following the Nazi Anschluss. Few art-world relationships have been as unlikely as the pairing of this Jewish refugee dealer with the elderly Yankee painter who would eventually become world-famous as “Grandma Moses.” That a recent Austrian emigré should have “discovered” one of the quintessential American artists of the “twentieth century speaks volumes about the intrinsic tolerance of American society. Kallir loved the “United States as only a refugee can, crediting it not just with saving his and his family’s lives, but with providing a freedom of opportunity that Austria could never, under any circumstances, have matched. Disappointed with the derivative art then common in New York galleries, Kallir was looking for an artist capable of capturing the authentic spirit of his new homeland. He found her in Grandma Moses.

 

“Grandma Moses” was an affectionate nickname that friends and family had given to Anna Mary Moses. The daughter of Mary and Russell King Robertson, Anna Mary was born in 1860 on a farm in upstate New York, about ten miles west of Bennington, Vermont. Like most farmers, she lived a life of constant hard work and occasional hardship. When she was twelve, she left home to earn her living as a “hired girl,” helping out on the farms of more prosperous neighbors. Schooling was a catch-as-catch-can affair—three months in winter, three in summer—with attendance often curtailed by bad weather or more pressing domestic chores. At the relatively late age of twenty-seven, Anna Mary married a “hired man,” Thomas Salmon Moses. The couple spent the initial eighteen years of their marriage in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. At first, they worked as tenant farmers, but eventually they saved enough to buy their own place. When times were tough, Anna Mary supplemented the family income by making and selling butter or potato chips. She gave birth to ten children, five of whom did not survive infancy.

 

In 1905, Thomas Moses persuaded his wife to return North, and they purchased a farm in Eagle Bridge, New York, not far from Anna Mary’s birthplace. The children gradually left home to start “families of their own, most settling in the area. After Thomas died of a heart attack in 1927, Anna Mary moved temporarily to Bennington to care for her daughter Anna, who was terminally ill with tuberculosis. It was here that, for the first time in her life, Grandma Moses had the freedom to indulge her interest in art. Picture-making developed as a natural extension of Moses’ domestic skills: she’d always decorated things around the house to make them prettier, and now, at Anna’s suggestion, she began creating embroidered landscapes in her spare time. Arthritis made it hard for her to hold a needle, however, and so Grandma gradually switched to paint, thereby embarking upon an unanticipated professional journey. Initially, Moses’s obsession seemed an odd indulgence. She soon had more pictures than she could give to family and friends, but when she tried exhibiting them at the country fair, alongside her prize-winning jams, the paintings received no notice. In the mid-1930s, she was invited to submit some of her work to a local “women’s exchange” sponsored by the drugstore in nearby Hoosick Falls, but again the pictures were largely ignored.

 

The pivotal event in Moses’ early career came in 1938, when a traveling collector, Louis Caldor, chanced upon the paintings in the drugstore and spontaneously bought them all. Caldor was an engineer who had emigrated to the U.S. from Hungary after World War I in active pursuit of the "American dream.” While his own career never quite took off, he more than made up for this in his prescient recognition of Grandma Moses. Still, at first Caldor must have appeared as foolhardy as the painting grandmother. He vowed—much to the bemusement of her family—to establish Moses professionally, and he began making the rounds of the New York galleries with a small collection of her paintings. Most dealers proved totally uninterested in devoting time and money to an artist who, then in her late seventies, seemed unlikely to live long enough to justify the investment. But after many months of fruitless effort, Caldor was referred through the emigré grapevine to Otto Kallir. Immediately impressed by the Moses paintings, Kallir agreed without hesitation to give the artist a one-woman show.

 

Moses’s debut at the Galerie St. Etienne came at the tail end of more than a decade of interest in self-taught art, which was actively championed by such art-world leaders as Alfred Barr, Director of the Museum of Modern Art. “Naïve” or “Primitive” painting was seen as an affirmation of the avant-garde’s anti-academicism, and Kallir’s experiences with modern art in Europe had in fact conditioned his receptivity to Grandma Moses. However, Moses quickly leap-frogged over the relatively narrow boundaries of the American “high” art establishment to reach an audience far larger than any ever before accorded a “fine” artist. The first painter to be taken up by the mass media, Moses benefited from such relatively new technological marvels as live-remote radio broadcasts and television, as well as the older vehicles of film and print. A plethora of Moses products—fabrics, plates, greeting cards, print reproductions and best-selling books—brought the artist’s work into millions of ordinary homes. While these Moses products seem modest by today’s marketing standards, the divide separating “high” and “low” art was sacrosanct during the 1940s and ‘50s. Thus the artist’s extreme popularity and commercial accessibility were felt by some to compromise her creative legitimacy.

 

Grandma Moses unwittingly became caught up in a battle for America’s artistic soul. After World War II, it grew evident that America needed an art commensurate with its new status as a superpower, and the U.S. government also soon recognized that art could be an important propaganda tool in fighting the Cold War. In the beginning, the exact form and content of this new American art were up for grabs. Modernism—as promoted by Barr and others before the war—was a distinctly European phenomenon. After the war, right-wing congressmen proposed that modernism was nothing less than a foreign Communist plot, a sneak attack on the nation’s creative vitality. President Harry Truman was certainly no fan of abstraction, which he called “ham-and-eggs art.” In keeping with this sensibility, he bestowed the Women’s National Press Club Award on Grandma Moses and, after the ceremony, entertained her at Blair House. When the U.S. Information Service began circulating exhibitions throughout war-torn Europe, Moses was one of the first artists to be signed on.

 

European audiences immediately took to Grandma Moses, whom they viewed without a trace of condescension and welcomed as an antidote to the perceived soullessness of American capitalism. However, this favorable response was misinterpreted by the American art establishment. “Europeans like to think of Grandma Moses… as representative of American art,” groused The New York Times in 1950. “They praise our naiveté and integrity… but they begrudge us a full, sophisticated artistic expression. Grandma Moses represents both what they expect of us and what they are willing to grant us.” In order to desvelop “a full sophisticated artistic expression,” America would need to hatch its own avant-garde, to snatch the reigns of progress and leadership from Europe. The advent of Abstract Expressionism in the late 1940s and early ‘50s seemed to provide just the ticket, and even the government’s naysayers eventually came to agree that abstraction had its advantages. Whereas much prewar American representational art had been left-wing in orientation, abstract art was mercifully free of overt content. It could thus conveniently be manipulated to serve a propaganda agenda juxtaposing democratic freedom with Communist oppression.

 

With this turn of events, Grandma Moses was relegated to a vast populist backwater. Mainstream art-world support for self-taught art had already dried up by the mid 1940s, squashed by the lobbying of trained American artists who felt wrongfully passed over by institutions such as MoMA. In the postwar period, contemporary artists and the museum establishment were at last in sync, united in favor of homegrown abstraction and against everything—representational, popular, “easy”—that might stand in the way of America’s international artistic hegemony. If Otto Kallir, who guided Moses’s career from 1940 onward, sometimes chafed that “his” artist was denied the sort of serious critical acclaim he felt she deserved, Moses herself was largely oblivious to such nuances. And despite her estrangement from the art-world elite, she only gained in global stature for the remainder of her very long life. In 1960 and ’61, her 100th and 101st birthdays were proclaimed "Grandma Moses Day” by New York’s Governor Nelson Rockefeller. When Moses died in December 1961, eulogies poured in from all over the world.

 

It is easy to understand what the Cold-War-era public, shaken by the recent memory of World War II and the new possibility of nuclear annihilation, saw in Grandma Moses. Her story could not have been more perfect had it been scripted by a Hollywood press agent. The farm, after all, is the prototypical American small business, combining self-sufficiency and independence with unsullied agrarian values. Moses was no Cinderella, plucked from the ash heap by a prince, but a female Horatio Alger, who made good by dint of talent and hard work. That she did so at an extremely advanced age also poignantly illustrated the adage, “It’s never too late.” While the coy “Grandma” moniker may have undercut her acceptance by the nation’s elite, it clearly struck a profound chord with the general public. Furthermore, Moses’s unassuming pose allowed her to slip below the radar screen that has generally prevented female artists from receiving renown comparable to that of their male colleagues. It is startling to think that Moses was not only one of the most successful artists of her time, she is probably the most famous woman artist of all time.

 

Like Norman Rockwell (with whom she is often compared), Grandma Moses is today undergoing something of a revival. The prejudices which “prompted some critics to dismiss her work have lifted, and the passage of time, while eclipsing the artist’s personal celebrity, has brought her paintings to the fore. “Grandma Moses in the 21st Century”—a loan exhibition curated by the Galerie St. Etienne that began a seven-venue tour in early 2001 and will be traveling through 2002—has evoked an unprecedented response from public and press alike. “Grandma Moses is back, and she’s enchanting” proclaimed Hilton Kramer, a critic not known as a soft touch. Peter Schjeldahl, writing in The New Yorker, concurred: “The paintings are always engaging, sometimes marvelous, and, after a long rest in genteel approbation, as good as new. . . .When you step up to a major Moses—near enough to behold cannily varied, unfussy textures and summary colors that affect the eye by temperature as well as by hue and tone—the picture’s scale turns vast and intimate simultaneously. Beauty happens.”

 

In order to transcend its historical moment, art must be pliable and ambiguous enough to be freshly interpreted by successive generations. Like the American flags that have become so ubiquitous since September 11, the paintings of Grandma Moses promote a sense of unity precisely because they are capable of embodying such disparate aspects of the American spirit. At one extreme is the harsh rigidity of nationalism, a “my-country-right-or-wrong” ethos that even ardent patriots sometimes question. At the other extreme is a profound tenderness, a belief in the flexibility of American society and in the human potential that flourishes when democracy is allowed free reign. Grandma Moses drew her broad-based audience from such inchoate interpretations of “American-ness,” but the ambiguities in her work could also provoke divergent reactions. Thus some found in Moses a kind of soothing nostalgia, while others rejected her for what they perceived to be cloying sentimentality. Both the artist’s admirers and her detractors projected onto Grandma Moses qualities that reflected their own agendas far more than they did her work or personality.

 

If a certain open-endedness characterizes all great art, the central ambiguity in Moses’s work derives from her relationship to the American past. In truth, Moses’s view of the past was neither nostalgic nor sentimental, but essentially allegorical. Unlike Norman Rockwell, Moses was not an illustrator, and whereas his characters have a specificity of appearance that identifies them with a distinct moment in history, the figures in a Grandma Moses painting are generic abstractions. Although her paintings are replete with “old-timey” details, such as women in long dresses and horse-drawn sleighs, these vignettes merely allude to the past, rather than slavishly replicating it. Considering how often Moses, in her heyday, was pitted against the rising American avant-garde, it is ironic to note that abstraction actually plays a pivotal role in her art, providing compositional structure while at the same time making her subjects universally accessible. The characters in a Grandma Moses painting are ciphers with whom almost anyone can readily identify.

 

The other half of Moses’s “secret” is realism, for whereas her figural vignettes are abstract, her rendering of the landscape is extraordinarily naturalistic. As a farmer, Moses was intimately familiar with the vicissitudes of weather, time of day and the changing seasons. And as an artist, she rapidly mastered the subtle color gradations and juxtapositions necessary to capture nature’s shifting moods. It is the landscape that breathes life into a Moses painting, lifting the allegorical vignettes from the past and carrying them into the present. In this manner, her work symbolically unites past with present, depicting them as an unbroken—and implicitly unbreakable—continuum that serves to secure the future. “Memory and hope,” as the artist herself put it, were the keys to her creative vision. In her art, as in her life, Moses looked backward and forward simultaneously. Her paintings expressed a profound faith in America’s heritage, and a firm belief that our values would endure and guide us safely into the future. Particularly cogent in the Cold War years, this is still very much a message for our own time.