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Past Exhibitions

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 11, 2017 - October 13, 2017


The Woman Question

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka

March 14, 2017 - June 30, 2017


You Say You Want a Revolution

American Artists and the Communist Party

October 18, 2016 - March 4, 2017


Recent Acquisitions

July 12, 2016 - October 7, 2016


Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Featuring Watercolors and Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection

March 29, 2016 - July 1, 2016


Paula Modersohn-Becker

Art and Life

November 3, 2015 - March 19, 2016


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 21, 2015 - October 16, 2015


Leonard Baskin

Wunderkammer

April 23, 2015 - July 2, 2015


Alternate Histories

Celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

January 15, 2015 - April 11, 2015


Marie-Louise Motesiczky

The Mother Paintings

October 7, 2014 - December 24, 2014


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 15, 2014 - September 26, 2014


Ilija/Mangelos

Father & Son, Inside & Out

April 24, 2014 - July 3, 2014


Modern Furies

The Lessons and Legacy of World War I

January 21, 2014 - April 12, 2014


Käthe Kollwitz

The Complete Print Cycles

October 8, 2013 - December 28, 2013


Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

July 9, 2013 - September 27, 2013


Face Time

Self and Identity in Expressionist Portraiture

April 9, 2013 - June 28, 2013


Story Lines

Tracing the Narrative of "Outsider" Art

January 15, 2013 - March 30, 2013


Egon Schiele's Women

October 23, 2012 - December 28, 2012


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 17, 2012 - October 13, 2012


Mad As Hell!

New Work (and Some Classics) by Sue Coe

April 17, 2012 - July 3, 2012


The Ins and Outs of Self-Taught Art

Reflections on a Shifting Field

January 10, 2012 - April 7, 2012


The Lady and the Tramp

Images of Women in Austrian and German Art

October 11, 2011 - December 30, 2011


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 5, 2011 - September 30, 2011


Decadence & Decay

Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, George Grosz

April 12, 2011 - June 24, 2011


Self-Taught Painters in American 1800-1950

Revisiting the Tradition

January 11, 2011 - April 2, 2011


Marie-Louise Motesiczky

Paradise Lost & Found

October 12, 2010 - December 30, 2010


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 13, 2010 - October 1, 2010


Käthe Kollwitz

A Portrait of the Artist

April 13, 2010 - June 25, 2010


Seventy Years Grandma Moses

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Artist's "Discovery"

February 3, 2010 - April 3, 2010


Egon Schiele as Printmaker

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 3, 2009 - January 23, 2010


From Brücke To Bauhaus

The Meanings of Modernity in Germany, 1905-1933

March 31, 2009 - June 26, 2009


They Taught Themselves

American Self-Taught Painters Between the World Wars

January 9, 2009 - March 14, 2009


Elephants We Must Never Forget

New Paintings Drawings and Prints by Sue Coe

October 14, 2008 - December 20, 2008


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2008 - September 26, 2008


Hope or Menace?

Communism in Germany Between the World Wars

March 25, 2008 - June 13, 2008


Transforming Reality

Pattern and Design in Modern and Self-Taught Art

January 15, 2008 - March 8, 2008


Leonard Baskin

Proofs and Process

October 9, 2007 - January 5, 2008


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 5, 2007 - September 28, 2007


Who Paid the Piper?

The Art of Patronage in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna

March 8, 2007 - May 26, 2007


Fairy Tale, Myth and Fantasy

Approaches to Spirituality in Art

December 7, 2006 - February 3, 2007


More Than Coffee was Served

Café Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna and Weimar Germany

September 19, 2006 - November 25, 2006


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 6, 2006 - September 8, 2006


Parallel Visions II

"Outsider" and "Insider" Art Today

April 5, 2006 - May 26, 2006


Ilija!

His First American Exhibtion

January 17, 2006 - March 18, 2006


Coming of Age

Egon Schiele and the Modernist Culture of Youth

November 15, 2005 - January 7, 2006


Sue Coe:

Sheep of Fools

September 20, 2005 - November 5, 2005


Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

June 7, 2005 - September 9, 2005


Every Picture Tells a Story

The Narrative Impulse in Modern and Contemporary Art

April 5, 2005 - May 27, 2005


65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part II

Self-Taught Artists

January 18, 2005 - March 26, 2005


65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part I

Austrian and German Expressionism

October 28, 2004 - January 8, 2005


Sue Coe: Bully: Master of the Global Merry-Go-Round and Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 8, 2004 - October 16, 2004


Animals & Us

The Animal in Contemporary Art

April 1, 2004 - May 22, 2004


Henry Darger

Art and Myth

January 15, 2004 - March 20, 2004


Body and Soul

Expressionism and the Human Figure

October 7, 2003 - January 3, 2004


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2003 - September 12, 2003


In Search of the "Total Artwork"

Viennese Art and Design 1897–1932

April 8, 2003 - June 14, 2003


Russia's Self-Taught Artists

A New Perspective on the "Outsider"

January 14, 2003 - March 29, 2003


Käthe Kollwitz:

Master Printmaker

October 1, 2002 - January 4, 2003


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 25, 2002 - September 20, 2002


Workers of the World

Modern Images of Labor

April 2, 2002 - June 15, 2002


Grandma Moses

Reflections of America

January 15, 2002 - March 16, 2002


Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoscha

From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

November 23, 2001 - January 5, 2002


The "Black-and-White" Show

Expressionist Graphics in Austria & Germany

September 20, 2001 - November 10, 2001


Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 26, 2001 - September 7, 2001


Art with an Agenda

Politics, Persuasion, Illustration and Decoration

April 10, 2001 - June 16, 2001


"Our Beautiful and Tormented Austria!": Art Brut in the Land of Freud

January 18, 2001 - March 17, 2001


The Tragedy of War

November 16, 2000 - January 6, 2001


The Expressionist City

September 19, 2000 - November 4, 2000


Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 20, 2000 - September 8, 2000


From Façade to Psyche

Turn-of-the-Century Portraiture in Austria & Germany

March 28, 2000 - June 10, 2000


European Self-Taught Art

Brut or Naive?

January 18, 2000 - March 11, 2000


Saved From Europe

In Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 6, 1999 - January 8, 2000


The Modern Child

(Images of Children in Twentieth-Century Art)

September 14, 1999 - November 6, 1999


Recent Acquisitions

(And a Look at Sixty Years of Art Dealing)

June 15, 1999 - September 3, 1999


Sue Coe: The Pit

The Tragical Tale of the Rise and Fall of a Vivisector

March 30, 1999 - June 5, 1999


Henry Darger and His Realms

January 14, 1999 - March 13, 1999


Becoming Käthe Kollwitz

An Artist and Her Influences

November 17, 1998 - December 31, 1998


George Grosz - Elfriede Lohse-Wächtler

Art & Gender in Weimar Germany

September 23, 1998 - November 11, 1998


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts About Looted Art)

June 9, 1998 - September 11, 1998


Taboo

Repression and Revolt in Modern Art

March 26, 1998 - May 30, 1998


Sacred & Profane

Michel Nedjar and Expressionist Primitivism

January 13, 1998 - March 14, 1998


Egon Schiele (1890-1918)

Master Draughtsman

November 18, 1997 - January 3, 1998


The New Objectivity

Realism in Weimar-Era Germany

September 16, 1997 - November 8, 1997


Recent Acquisitions

A Question of Quality

June 10, 1997 - September 5, 1997


Käthe Kollwitz - Lea Grundig

Two German Women & The Art of Protest

March 25, 1997 - May 31, 1997


That Way Madness Lies

Expressionism and the Art of Gugging

January 14, 1997 - March 15, 1997


The Viennese Line

Art and Design Circa 1900

November 18, 1996 - January 4, 1997


Emil Nolde - Christian Rohlfs

Two German Expressionist Masters

September 24, 1996 - November 9, 1996


Breaking All The Rules

Art in Transition

June 11, 1996 - September 6, 1996


Sue Coe's Ship of Fools

March 26, 1996 - May 24, 1996


New York Folk

Lawrence Lebduska, Abraham Levin, Isreal Litwak

January 16, 1996 - March 16, 1996


The Fractured Form

Expressionism and the Human Body

November 15, 1995 - January 6, 1996


From Left to Right

Social Realism in Germany and Russia, Circa 1919-1933

September 19, 1995 - November 4, 1995


Recent Acquisitions

June 20, 1995 - September 8, 1995


On the Brink 1900-2000

The Turning of Two Centuries

March 28, 1995 - May 26, 1995


Earl Cummingham - Grandma Moses

Visions of America

January 17, 1995 - March 18, 1995


Drawn to Text: Comix Artists as Book Illustrators

November 15, 1994 - January 7, 1995


Three Berlin Artists of the Weimar Era: Hannah Höch, Käthe Kollwitz, Jeanne Mam

September 13, 1994 - November 5, 1994


55th Anniversary Exhibition in Memory of Otto Kallir

June 7, 1994 - September 2, 1994


Sue Coe: We All Fall Down

March 29, 1994 - May 27, 1994


The Forgotten Folk Art of the 1940's

January 18, 1994 - March 19, 1994


Symbolism and the Austrian Avant Garde

Klimt, Schiele and their Contemporaries

November 16, 1993 - January 8, 1994


Art and Politics in Weimar Germany

September 14, 1993 - November 6, 1993


Recent Acquisitions

June 8, 1993 - September 3, 1993


The "Outsider" Question

Non-Academic Art from 1900 to the Present

March 23, 1993 - May 28, 1993


The Dance of Death

Images of Mortality in German Art

January 19, 1993 - March 13, 1993


Art Spiegelman

The Road to Maus

November 17, 1992 - January 9, 1993


Käthe Kollwitz

In Celebration of the 125th Anniversary of the Artist's Birth

September 15, 1992 - November 7, 1992


Naive Visions/Art Nouveau and Expressionism/Sue Coe: The Road to the White House

May 19, 1992 - September 4, 1992


Richard Gerstl/Oskar Kokoschka

March 17, 1992 - May 9, 1992


Scandal, Outrage, Censorship

Controversy in Modern Art

January 21, 1992 - March 7, 1992


Viennese Graphic Design

From Secession to Expressionism

November 19, 1991 - January 11, 1992


The Expressionist Figure

September 10, 1991 - November 9, 1991


Recent Acquisitions

Themes and Variations

May 14, 1991 - August 16, 1991


Sue Coe Retrospective

Political Document of a Decade

March 12, 1991 - May 5, 1991


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, drawings and prints

January 22, 1991 - March 2, 1991


Egon Schiele

November 13, 1990 - January 12, 1991


Lovis Corinth

A Retrospective

September 11, 1990 - November 3, 1990


Recent Acquisitions

June 12, 1990 - August 31, 1990


Max Klinger, Käthe Kollwitz, Alfred Kubin

A Study in Influences

March 27, 1990 - June 2, 1990


The Narrative in Art

January 23, 1990 - March 17, 1990


Grandma Moses

November 14, 1989 - January 13, 1990


Sue Coe

Porkopolis--Animals and Industry

September 19, 1989 - November 4, 1989


The Galerie St. Etienne

A History in Documents and Pictures

June 20, 1989 - September 8, 1989


Gustav Klimt

Paintings and Drawings

April 11, 1989 - June 10, 1989


Fifty Years Galerie St. Etienne: An Overview

February 14, 1989 - April 1, 1989


Folk Artists at Work

Morris Hirshfield, John Kane and Grandma Moses

November 15, 1988 - January 14, 1989


Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

June 14, 1988 - September 16, 1988


From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

April 12, 1988 - May 27, 1988


Three Pre-Expressionists

Lovis Corinth Käthe Kollwitz Paula Modersohn-Becker

January 26, 1988 - March 12, 1988


Käthe Kollwitz

The Power of the Print

November 17, 1987 - January 16, 1988


Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

April 7, 1987 - October 31, 1987


Folk Art of This Century

February 10, 1987 - March 28, 1987


Oskar Kokoschka and His Time

November 25, 1986 - January 31, 1987


Viennese Design and Wiener Werkstätte

September 23, 1986 - November 8, 1986


Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, Drawings and Prints

May 27, 1986 - September 13, 1986


Expressionist Painters

March 25, 1986 - May 10, 1986


Käthe Kollwitz/Paula Modersohn-Becker

January 28, 1986 - March 15, 1986


The Art of Giving

December 3, 1985 - January 18, 1986


Expressionists on Paper

October 8, 1985 - November 23, 1985


European and American Landscapes

June 4, 1985 - September 13, 1985


Expressionist Printmaking

Aspects of its Genesis and Development

April 1, 1985 - May 24, 1985


Expressionist Masters

January 18, 1985 - March 23, 1985


Arnold Schoenberg's Vienna

November 13, 1984 - January 5, 1985


Grandma Moses and Selected Folk Paintings

September 25, 1984 - November 3, 1984


American Folk Art

People, Places and Things

June 12, 1984 - September 14, 1984


John Kane

Modern America's First Folk Painter

April 17, 1984 - May 25, 1984


Eugène Mihaesco

The Illustrator as Artist

February 28, 1984 - April 7, 1984


Early Expressionist Masters

January 17, 1984 - February 18, 1984


Paula Modersohn-Becker

Germany's Pioneer Modernist

November 15, 1983 - January 7, 1984


Gustav Klimt

Drawings and Selected Paintings

September 20, 1983 - November 5, 1983


Early and Late

Drawings, Paintings & Prints from Academicism to Expressionism

June 1, 1983 - September 2, 1983


Alfred Kubin

Visions From The Other Side

March 22, 1983 - May 7, 1983


20th Century Folk

The First Generation

January 18, 1983 - March 12, 1983


Grandma Moses

The Artist Behind the Myth

November 15, 1982 - January 8, 1983


Käthe Kollwitz

The Artist as Printmaker

September 28, 1982 - November 6, 1982


Aspects of Modernism

June 1, 1982 - September 3, 1982


The Human Perspective

Recent Acquisitions

March 16, 1982 - May 15, 1982


19th and 20th Century European and American Folk Art

January 19, 1982 - March 6, 1982


The Folk Art Tradition

Naïve Painting in Europe and the United States

November 17, 1981 - January 9, 1982


Austria's Expressionism

April 21, 1981 - May 30, 1981


Eugène Mihaesco

His First American One-Man Show

March 3, 1981 - April 11, 1981


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele

November 12, 1980 - December 27, 1980


Summer Exhibition

June 17, 1980 - October 31, 1980


Kollwitz: The Drawing and The Print

May 1, 1980 - June 10, 1980


40th Anniversary Exhibition

November 13, 1979 - December 28, 1979


American Primitive Art

November 22, 1977


Käthe Kollwitz

December 1, 1976


Neue Galerie-Galerie St. Etienne

A Documentary Exhibition

May 1, 1976


Martin Pajeck

January 27, 1976


Georges Rouault and Frans Masereel

April 29, 1972


Branko Paradis

December 1, 1971


Käthe Kollwitz

February 3, 1971


Egon Schiele

The Graphic Work

October 19, 1970


Gustav Klimt

March 20, 1970


Friedrich Hundertwasser

May 6, 1969


Austrian Art of the 20th Century

March 21, 1969


Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

October 31, 1968


Yugoslav Primitive Art

April 30, 1968


Alfred Kubin

January 30, 1968


Käthe Kollwitz

In the Cause of Humanity

October 23, 1967


Abraham Levin

September 26, 1967


Karl Stark

April 5, 1967


Gustav Klimt

February 4, 1967


The Wiener Werkstätte

November 16, 1966


Oskar Laske

October 25, 1965


Käthe Kollwitz

May 1, 1965


Egon Schiele

Watercolors and Drawings from American Collections

March 1, 1965


25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part II

November 21, 1964


25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

October 17, 1964


Mary Urban

June 9, 1964


Werner Berg, Jane Muus and Mura Dehn

May 5, 1964


Eugen Spiro

April 4, 1964


B. F. Dolbin

Drawings of an Epoch

March 3, 1964


Austrian Expressionists

January 6, 1964


Joseph Rifesser

December 3, 1963


Panorama of Yugoslav Primitive Art

October 21, 1963


Joe Henry

Watercolors of Vermont

May 1, 1963


French Impressionists

March 8, 1963


Grandma Moses

Memorial Exhibition

November 26, 1962


Group Show

October 15, 1962


Ernst Barlach

March 23, 1962


Martin Pajeck

February 24, 1962


Paintings by Expressionists

January 27, 1962


Käthe Kollwitz

November 11, 1961


Grandma Moses

September 7, 1961


My Friends

Fourth Biennial of Pictures by American School Children

May 27, 1961


Raimonds Staprans

April 17, 1961


Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka and Alfred Kubin

March 14, 1961


Marvin Meisels

January 23, 1961


Egon Schiele

November 15, 1960


My Life's History

Paintings by Grandma Moses

September 12, 1960


Watercolors and Drawings by Austrian Artists from the Dial Collection

May 2, 1960


Martin Pajeck

February 29, 1960


Eugen Spiro

February 6, 1960


Käthe Kollwitz

December 14, 1959


Josef Scharl

Last Paintings and Drawings

November 11, 1959


European and American Expressionists

September 22, 1959


Our Town

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

May 23, 1959


Marvin Meisels and Martin Pajeck

May 1, 1959


Gustav Klimt

April 1, 1959


Käthe Kollwitz

January 12, 1959


Oskar Kokoschka

October 28, 1958


Village Life in Guatemala

Paintings by Andres Curuchich

June 3, 1958


Two Unknown American Expressionists

Paintings by Marvin Meisels and Martin Pajeck

April 28, 1958


Paula Modersohn-Becker

March 15, 1958


The Great Tradition in American Painting

American Primitive Art

January 20, 1958


Jules Lefranc and Dominique Lagru

Two French Primitives

November 18, 1957


Margret Bilger

October 22, 1957


The Four Seasons

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

June 11, 1957


Grandma Moses

May 6, 1957


Alfred Kubin

April 3, 1957


Franz Lerch

March 2, 1957


Egon Schiele

January 21, 1957


Josef Scharl

Memorial Exhibition

November 17, 1956


Irma Rothstein

May 19, 1956


Käthe Kollwitz

April 16, 1956


A Tribute to Grandma Moses

November 28, 1955


As I See Myself

One Hundred Paintings by American School Children

May 20, 1955


Juan De'Prey

April 19, 1955


Erich Heckel

March 29, 1955


Freddy Homburger

March 2, 1955


Masters of the 19th Century

January 18, 1955


Oskar Kokoschka

November 29, 1954


Isabel Case Borgatta and Josef Scharl

October 12, 1954


James N. Rosenberg and Eugen Spiro

April 30, 1954


Per Krogh

April 2, 1954


Cuno Amiet

February 16, 1954


Eniar Jolin

January 14, 1954


Irma Rothstein

December 8, 1953


Josef Scharl

November 11, 1953


Grandma Moses

October 21, 1953 - October 24, 1953


Wilhelm Kaufmann

September 30, 1953


Lovis Corinth, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele

May 27, 1953


A Grandma Moses Album

Recent Paintings, 1950-1953

April 15, 1953


Streeter Blair

American Primitive

February 26, 1953


Paintings on Glass

Austrian Religious Folk Art of the 17th to 19th Centuries

December 4, 1952


Hasan Kaptan

Paintings of a Ten-Year-Old Turkish Painter

October 29, 1952


Margret Bilger

May 10, 1952


American Natural Painters

March 31, 1952


Ten Years of New York Concert Impressions by Eugen Spiro; Four New Paintings by

January 26, 1952


I-Fa-Wei

Watercolors of New York by a Chinese Artist

December 1, 1951


Käthe Kollwitz

October 25, 1951


Drawings and Watercolors by Austrian Children

May 21, 1951


Grandma Moses

Twenty-Five Masterpieces of Primitive Art

March 17, 1951


Roswitha Bitterlich

January 18, 1951


Oskar Laske

Watercolors of Vienna and the Salzkammergut

October 14, 1950


Tenth Anniversary Exhibition

Part II

May 11, 1950


Austrian Art of the 19th Century

From Wadlmüller to Klimt

April 1, 1950


Chiao Ssu-Tu

February 18, 1950


Anton Faistauer

January 1, 1950


Tenth Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

November 30, 1949


Autograph Exhibition

October 26, 1949


Gladys Wertheim Bachrach

May 24, 1949


Oskar Kokoschka

March 30, 1949


Eugen Spiro

February 19, 1949


Frans Masereel

January 13, 1949


Ten Years Grandma Moses

November 22, 1948


Käthe Kollwitz

Masterworks

October 18, 1948


American Primitives

June 3, 1948


Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

April 5, 1948


Miriam Richman

February 7, 1948


Vally Wieselthier

Memorial Exhibition

January 10, 1948


Christmas Exhibition

December 4, 1947


Fritz von Unruh

November 10, 1947


Käthe Kollwitz

October 4, 1947


Grandma Moses

May 17, 1947


Lovis Corinth

April 16, 1947


Hugo Steiner-Prag

March 15, 1947


Mark Baum

January 11, 1947


Eugen Spiro

November 25, 1946


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

May 17, 1946


Ladis W. Sabo

Paintings by a New Primitive Artist

April 8, 1946


Georges Rouault

The Graphic Work

February 26, 1946


Käthe Kollwitz

Memorial Exhibition

November 21, 1945


Fred E. Robertson

Paintings by an American Primitive

June 13, 1945


Max Liebermann

The Graphic Work

April 18, 1945


Vienna through Four Centuries

March 1, 1945


Eugen Spiro

January 20, 1945


Grandma Moses

New Paintings

December 5, 1944


Käthe Kollwitz

Part II

October 26, 1944


A Century of French Graphic Art

From Géricault to Picasso

September 28, 1944


Max Liebermann

Memorial Exhibition

June 9, 1944


Juan De'Prey

Paintings by a Self-Taught Artist from Puerto Rico

May 6, 1944


Abraham Levin

April 15, 1944


Lesser Ury

Memorial Exhibition

March 21, 1944


Grandma Moses

Paintings by the Senior of the American Primitives

February 9, 1944


Betty Lane

January 11, 1944


WaIt Disney Cavalcade

December 9, 1943


Käthe Kollwitz

Part I

November 3, 1943


Will Barnet

September 29, 1943


Lovis Corinth

May 26, 1943


Josephine Joy

Paintings by an American Primitive

May 3, 1943


Oskar Kokoschka

Aspects of His Art

March 31, 1943


Eugen Spiro

February 13, 1943


Seymour Lipton

January 18, 1943


Illuminated Gothic Woodcuts

Printed and Painted, 1477-1493

December 5, 1942


Abraham Levin

November 4, 1942


Walt Disney Originals

September 23, 1942


Documents which Relate History

Documents of Historical Importance and Landmarks of Human Development

June 10, 1942


Honoré Daumier

April 29, 1942


Bertha Trabich

Memorial Exhibition of a Russian-American Primitive

March 25, 1942


Alfred Kubin

Master of Drawing

December 4, 1941


Egon Schiele

November 7, 1941


Betty Lane

June 3, 1941


Flowers from Old Vienna

18th and Early 19th Century Flower Painting

May 7, 1941


Weavings by Navaho and Hopi Indians and Photos of Indians by Helen M. Post

January 29, 1941


Georg Merkel

November 7, 1940


What a Farm Wife Painted

Works by Mrs. Anna Mary Moses

October 9, 1940


Saved from Europe

Masterpieces of European Art

July 1, 1940


American Abstract Art

May 22, 1940


Franz Lerch

May 1, 1940


Wilhelm Thöny

April 3, 1940


French Masters of the 19th and 20th Centuries

February 29, 1940


H. W. Hannau

Metropolis, Photographic Studies of New York

February 2, 1940


Oskar Kokoschka

January 9, 1940


Austrian Masters

November 13, 1939


65TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, PART I

Austrian and German Expressionism

October 28, 2004 - January 8, 2005

ARTISTS

Corinth, Lovis

Gerstl, Richard

Heckel, Erich

Jungnickel, Ludwig Heinrich

Klimt, Gustav

Kokoschka, Bohuslav

Kokoschka, Oskar

Kollwitz, Käthe

Kubin, Alfred

Laske, Oskar

Modersohn-Becker, Paula

Pechstein, Hermann Max

Schiele, Egon

ESSAY

As many people know, in 2001 the New York collector Ronald Lauder decided to name his Museum of Austrian and German Art, the Neue Galerie, after the original Vienna gallery of Otto Kallir, founder of the Galerie St. Etienne. It was an exceedingly gracious way to honor the man who had introduced such luminaries as Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele to the United States, and whose 57th Street gallery has, since 1939, been a way station for many other pioneering German and Austrian modernists. The august, exquisitely renovated museum on Fifth Avenue is also a telling affirmation of the extent to which, over 65 years, the Galerie St. Etienne has succeeded in securing the American reputations of artists who were once entirely unknown on these shores. And yet it is hard to imagine two places as different as Lauder’s grand museum and the original Neue Galerie, a warren of unassuming rooms on the Grünangergasse, about a block from the Cathedral of St. Stephen in the heart of old Vienna. The history of the Galerie St. Etienne’s last 65 years is a tale of triumph, but it is also a tale of massive change and upheaval.

 

In 1923, when the original Neue Galerie opened, Austria was at a political and economic crossroads. The nation had only just emerged in 1918 from the far larger Austro-Hungarian Empire, which was dismantled after its defeat in the First World War. As the new country struggled to reconfigure a national identity, it also had to contend with the loss of an industrial base located in former territories that were now independent. The widespread fear that Austria could not make it on its own was one factor that eventually contributed to its absorption, in 1938, into the German Reich of Adolf Hitler. Thus from the beginning of his career, Kallir had to contend personally with fallout from historical events. His once prosperous, middleclass family had lost most of their assets with the collapse of the Empire. And the rising tide of anti-Semitism after World War I made it impossible for Kallir to pursue his chosen profession, engineering. Having served a brief apprenticeship with an uncle who owned a printing press, he turned his childhood interests in manuscript collecting and art into his first business venture. The Verlag Neuer Graphik, a publisher of original art prints and deluxe book editions, issued its inaugural publication, a portfolio of lithographs by the abstract artist Johannes Itten, in 1919.

 

Although both the Verlag Neuer Graphik and Neue Galerie were established at an inauspicious political moment, Kallir was responsive to the tastes and economic requirements of his times. Trial and error, false starts and concessions to practicality were thus as much a part of the program at both enterprises as were the ambitious projects for which they are today best remembered. With the backing of the financier Richard Kola, Kallir's Verlag issued a portfolio of eight Schiele prints in 1922, as well as lavishly bound editions containing original graphics by Alfred Kubin, Ludwig Heinrich Jungnickel, Oskar Laske and Julius Zimpel (co-director, from 1923 until his premature death in 1925, of the Wiener Werkstätte). Kola’s bankruptcy more or less coincided with the founding of the Neue Galerie, and the Verlag Neuer Graphik morphed into the Johannes Presse, named after Kallir’s newborn son. The Neue Galerie represented many of the same artists as the Verlag Neuer Graphik, and the Johannes Presse continued to publish their work periodically. Among the Johannes Presse’s more notable achievements was a comedy, Ebbi, written and illustrated with etchings by Max Beckmann, and a play illustrated by Oskar Kokoschka and written by his brother Bohuslav. Sometimes working in conjunction with the Hagenbund, a non-profit artist’s association, the Neue Galerie mounted major exhibitions of such modern Austrian masters as Schiele, Klimt and Kokoschka. In 1931, Kallir “discovered” Richard Gerstl, a totally unknown artist who had committed suicide in 1908 and who is now considered one of Austria’s foremost and earliest Expressionists. Equally important, at a time when Austria suffered from entrenched cultural provincialism, the Neue Galerie promoted the work of major foreign artists such as Lovis Corinth, Edvard Munch, Auguste Renoir, Paul Signac and Vincent van Gogh.

 

Yet the Neue Galerie’s many forward-thinking projects, though sometimes quite costly, were not necessarily lucrative. Austrian collectors remained essentially conservative, and Kallir paid his bills primarily though the sale of works by nineteenth-century artists such as Thomas Ender, Friedrich Gauermann, Anton Romako and Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller. During the Depression that followed the American stock-market crash of 1929, Kallir widened his net even further in an attempt to make ends meet. Tapping his own old collecting interests, he showed musical manuscripts by Johann Strauss, historical documents from World War I and aeronautical memorabilia. He held periodic exhibitions of low-budget works, rented out the Neue Galerie at night to an acting school and took photographs of stage personalities for the local press.

 

When faced with imminent, massive changes in ones historical circumstances, it can be hard to distinguish between prudence and paranoia. Otto Kallir, who all his life had been aware of the process of history unfolding around him, was keenly attuned to the threat posed by Hitler’s rise to power in neighboring Germany. As early as 1935, Kallir sold his aeronautical collection in Switzerland and banked the proceeds there. He fought for Austria’s independence up until the moment of the Nazi Anschluss in March 1938 (a position that soon put him on the Gestapo’s watch list), but he also sent more money abroad in late 1937, so that when the time came, he had the wherewithal to finance his family’s emigration. As it was illegal for Jews to own businesses under the Nazis, he sold the Neue Galerie to his “Aryan” secretary, Vita Künstler. With the help of Künstler and other sympathetic gentiles, he was quickly able to wrap up his affairs and arrange to export his household goods and a portion of his art inventory (consisting chiefly of the so-called “degenerate” modern works that were of little interest to Hitler). In June, after depositing his wife and two children in German-speaking Switzerland, Kallir set off for Paris, where he established the Galerie St. Etienne. The new French name was an homage to the Cathedral of St. Stephen and to the Viennese heritage that he hoped to preserve.

 

Because the Swiss would not give him a work permit and the French would not grant his wife and children entrance visas, Kallir searched for a third country willing to take them all. In 1939, through the exceptional kindness of his former sister-in-law and her American second husband, Kallir obtained United States visas for the entire family. They arrived in New York that September, just days before the Second World War broke out in Europe. By November 1939, the Galerie St. Etienne’s New York branch was up and running. The gallery’s initial program covered the same eclectic mix of subjects that had lately characterized the Neue Galerie; if one venture failed, Kallir had the flexibility to mount another. In addition to introducing the principal Austrian modernists—Klimt (given his first American one-man show in 1959), Kokoschka (1940), Kubin (1941) and Schiele (1941)—the gallery showcased nineteenth-century Austrian art (far less successfully than in Vienna), historical documents and French modernism (the only school of modernism for which there was then a market in America). The Galerie St. Etienne came, over the years, to focus more intently on some of the German artists, such as Lovis Corinth and Käthe Kollwitz, who had figured only sporadically in the program of its Viennese predecessor. Among the German artists who had their first American one-person exhibitions here were Erich Heckel (1955) and Paula Modersohn-Becker (1958).

 

Although he mounted a pioneering show of American abstract art in 1940 (which included work by Josef Albers and Arshile Gorky), Otto Kallir found the local contemporary art scene on the whole disappointing and derivative. Believing that American photographic postcards were completely lacking in artistic merit, he sponsored an emigré photographer, H. W. Hannau, and launched a short-lived company to publish scenic views. Kallir felt that the intrinsic genius of his adopted homeland was encapsulated not in its “high” art, but in Native American crafts, Walt Disney cartoons and folk art. During the first four decades of the twentieth century, interest in self-taught artists was very much part of the modernist philosophy, and Kallir was attracted to both nineteenth-century and contemporary exemplars of the genre. He is, however, most frequently associated with the “discovery” of Grandma Moses, who had her first one-woman show at the Galerie St. Etienne in October 1940. (Part II of the Galerie St. Etienne’s 65th Anniversary Exhibition, scheduled to open on January 18, 2005, will focus on self-taught art.)

 

When Otto Kallir was a boy in Vienna, art dealers were hardly different from other small shopkeepers, such as booksellers. (And in fact, several prominent early twentieth-century Austrian art dealers, such as Hugo Heller and Richard Lanyi, were booksellers.) Both in Austria and elsewhere, however, modernism demanded a change in the art dealer’s approach. In order to create a market for art that was deliberately challenging, dealers had to become impresarios and ambassadors, forging links between the artistic community and a skeptical public. In America, modernism was initially a foreign import, and dealers often served an educational function which equaled or surpassed that of local museums. This was a role, as it turned out, to which Kallir was extremely well suited, and he flourished in New York’s adventuresome environment as he never could have in more conservative Vienna. That is not to say he had an easy time of it. At first his English was poor, his American professional contacts nil and his most-cherished artists virtually unknown outside of Austria. Nonetheless, Kallir gradually built bridges to American curators and collectors, patiently imparting his own carefully cultivated knowledge and enthusiasm.

 

From 1939 to the present, educational activities have formed a significant part of the Galerie St. Etienne’s agenda. Starting with the Neue Galerie’s early collaborations with the Hagenbund, and continuing through Schiele’s and Klimt’s first American museum shows, Kallir allocated significant energies and resources to mounting loan exhibitions in which little or nothing was for sale. Understanding that American museums serve as gatekeepers to the public’s tastes, he endeavored to place as many major works as possible in institutional collections, selling them at a discount or giving them outright. He also shared his knowledge through the compilation of catalogues raisonnés: three on Schiele (1930, 1966 and 1970), and one each on Grandma Moses (1972) and Richard Gerstl (1974).

 

After Otto Kallir’s death in 1978, the Galerie St. Etienne not only continued but expanded upon these scholarly activities. Owing in part to the success of Kallir’s efforts, there was a much greater institutional demand for exhibitions on Austrian modernism, and over the last twenty-five years we have curated shows for museums all over America and Europe. Ambitious loan shows have also been a regular feature on our own 57th Street premises. Jane Kallir (Otto’s granddaughter and, along with his long-time partner Hildegard Bachert, gallery co-director) has written over a dozen art books, including the first catalogue raisonné of Schiele’s work in all media (1990; revised 1998). In addition, every Galerie St. Etienne exhibition since 1979 has been accompanied by an essay that either discusses an art-historical theme in depth, or endeavors to place the exhibited works in the context of current events and the market.

 

While the growing interest in Austrian and German Expressionism has created more demand for exhibitions and books on the subject, it has also, paradoxically, created less need for them. It is not longer necessary to proselytize on behalf of Germanic modernism, or for that matter, modernism in general. In this sense, many secondary market dealers today somewhat resemble the shopkeepers of yore; they do not have to mount exhibitions or even maintain public spaces. They cater to an established clientele, and their main task is chasing after an ever-dwindling supply of good inventory. The sort of scholarship required by today’s market is not so much educational as commercial. Rising prices have placed greater emphasis on such once arcane areas of study as authenticity and provenance. At the same time, an obsession with “masterpieces” often obscures the art-historical context provided by an artist’s lesser works or those of less illustrious contemporaries.

 

If there is one leitmotif that underlies all the Galerie St. Etienne’s activities, it is the appreciation of art-historical and historical context. The gallery was, after all, profoundly shaped by the forces of history: we and the art we represent literally would not be here today had Hitler not expelled us and it. None of us knows where history may take us next, but we do know that the present moment is only a transitory link between the past and the future. Thus in our exhibitions, books and checklist essays, we are constantly sifting through the shards of history, making connections and looking for explanations. The dialogue between art and its public changes all the time, as needs and interests change. In our ongoing attempts to chart that dialogue, we hope to offer not definitive answers, but at least helpful guidance.

 

We would like to warmly thank all the lenders whose generous cooperation has made this exhibition possible, including Mrs. Henry Grunwald, the Neue Galerie, New York, Mrs. Gilbert Rothschild and numerous anonymous collectors. A more detailed history of the Galerie St. Etienne may be found in Jane Kallir’s book Saved From Europe (112 pages; 33 color plates; 36 duotone illustrations). Copies may be ordered for $25.00 (hardcover) or $15.00 (soft cover), plus $7.00 postage and handing; New York residents please add sales tax. Checklist entries include catalogue raisonné numbers, where applicable. Full sizes are given for paintings, watercolors and drawings, image sizes for prints. A selection of the exhibited works can be viewed on-line at www.gseart.com.