Egon Schiele

Left: Self-Portrait, Bust. 1912. Watercolor and pencil. Promised Gift to the National Gallery of Art.

Right: Portrait of Paris von Gütersloh. 1918. Oil. The Minneapolis Institute of Arts.


Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 11, 2017 - October 13, 2017

The Woman Question

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka

March 14, 2017 - June 30, 2017

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 12, 2016 - October 7, 2016

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 21, 2015 - October 16, 2015

Alternate Histories

Celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

January 15, 2015 - April 11, 2015

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 15, 2014 - September 26, 2014

Modern Furies

The Lessons and Legacy of World War I

January 21, 2014 - April 12, 2014

Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

July 9, 2013 - September 27, 2013

Face Time

Self and Identity in Expressionist Portraiture

April 9, 2013 - June 28, 2013

* Egon Schiele's Women

October 23, 2012 - December 28, 2012

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 17, 2012 - October 13, 2012

The Lady and the Tramp

Images of Women in Austrian and German Art

October 11, 2011 - December 30, 2011

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 5, 2011 - September 30, 2011

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

July 13, 2010 - October 1, 2010

* Egon Schiele as Printmaker

A Loan Exhibition Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 3, 2009 - January 23, 2010

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2008 - September 26, 2008

Transforming Reality

Pattern and Design in Modern and Self-Taught Art

January 15, 2008 - March 8, 2008

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 5, 2007 - September 28, 2007

Who Paid the Piper?

The Art of Patronage in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna

March 8, 2007 - May 26, 2007

More Than Coffee was Served

Café Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna and Weimar Germany

September 19, 2006 - November 25, 2006

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 6, 2006 - September 8, 2006

* Coming of Age

Egon Schiele and the Modernist Culture of Youth

November 15, 2005 - January 7, 2006

Recent Acquisitions

And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market

June 7, 2005 - September 9, 2005

65th Anniversary Exhibition, Part I

Austrian and German Expressionism

October 28, 2004 - January 8, 2005

Sue Coe: Bully: Master of the Global Merry-Go-Round and Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 8, 2004 - October 16, 2004

Body and Soul

Expressionism and the Human Figure

October 7, 2003 - January 3, 2004

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 24, 2003 - September 12, 2003

In Search of the "Total Artwork"

Viennese Art and Design 1897–1932

April 8, 2003 - June 14, 2003

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 25, 2002 - September 20, 2002

Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoscha

From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

November 23, 2001 - January 5, 2002

The "Black-and-White" Show

Expressionist Graphics in Austria & Germany

September 20, 2001 - November 10, 2001

Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 26, 2001 - September 7, 2001

Art with an Agenda

Politics, Persuasion, Illustration and Decoration

April 10, 2001 - June 16, 2001

The Expressionist City

September 19, 2000 - November 4, 2000

Recent Acquisitions (And Some Thoughts on the Current Art Market)

June 20, 2000 - September 8, 2000

From Façade to Psyche

Turn-of-the-Century Portraiture in Austria & Germany

March 28, 2000 - June 10, 2000

Saved From Europe

In Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the Galerie St. Etienne

November 6, 1999 - January 8, 2000

The Modern Child

(Images of Children in Twentieth-Century Art)

September 14, 1999 - November 6, 1999

Recent Acquisitions

(And a Look at Sixty Years of Art Dealing)

June 15, 1999 - September 3, 1999

Recent Acquisitions

(And Some Thoughts About Looted Art)

June 9, 1998 - September 11, 1998

Sacred & Profane

Michel Nedjar and Expressionist Primitivism

January 13, 1998 - March 14, 1998

* Egon Schiele (1890-1918)

Master Draughtsman

November 18, 1997 - January 3, 1998

Recent Acquisitions

A Question of Quality

June 10, 1997 - September 5, 1997

That Way Madness Lies

Expressionism and the Art of Gugging

January 14, 1997 - March 15, 1997

The Viennese Line

Art and Design Circa 1900

November 18, 1996 - January 4, 1997

Breaking All The Rules

Art in Transition

June 11, 1996 - September 6, 1996

The Fractured Form

Expressionism and the Human Body

November 15, 1995 - January 6, 1996

Recent Acquisitions

June 20, 1995 - September 8, 1995

On the Brink 1900-2000

The Turning of Two Centuries

March 28, 1995 - May 26, 1995

55th Anniversary Exhibition in Memory of Otto Kallir

June 7, 1994 - September 2, 1994

Symbolism and the Austrian Avant Garde

Klimt, Schiele and their Contemporaries

November 16, 1993 - January 8, 1994

Recent Acquisitions

June 8, 1993 - September 3, 1993

Naive Visions/Art Nouveau and Expressionism/Sue Coe: The Road to the White House

May 19, 1992 - September 4, 1992

Scandal, Outrage, Censorship

Controversy in Modern Art

January 21, 1992 - March 7, 1992

Viennese Graphic Design

From Secession to Expressionism

November 19, 1991 - January 11, 1992

The Expressionist Figure

September 10, 1991 - November 9, 1991

Recent Acquisitions

Themes and Variations

May 14, 1991 - August 16, 1991

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, drawings and prints

January 22, 1991 - March 2, 1991

* Egon Schiele

November 13, 1990 - January 12, 1991

Recent Acquisitions

June 12, 1990 - August 31, 1990

The Galerie St. Etienne

A History in Documents and Pictures

June 20, 1989 - September 8, 1989

Fifty Years Galerie St. Etienne: An Overview

February 14, 1989 - April 1, 1989

Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

June 14, 1988 - September 16, 1988

From Art Nouveau to Expressionism

April 12, 1988 - May 27, 1988

Recent Acquisitions and Works From the Collection

April 7, 1987 - October 31, 1987

Oskar Kokoschka and His Time

November 25, 1986 - January 31, 1987

Viennese Design and Wiener Werkstätte

September 23, 1986 - November 8, 1986

Gustav Klimt/Egon Schiele/Oskar Kokoschka

Watercolors, Drawings and Prints

May 27, 1986 - September 13, 1986

Expressionist Painters

March 25, 1986 - May 10, 1986

Expressionists on Paper

October 8, 1985 - November 23, 1985

European and American Landscapes

June 4, 1985 - September 13, 1985

Expressionist Printmaking

Aspects of its Genesis and Development

April 1, 1985 - May 24, 1985

Arnold Schoenberg's Vienna

November 13, 1984 - January 5, 1985

Early and Late

Drawings, Paintings & Prints from Academicism to Expressionism

June 1, 1983 - September 2, 1983

Aspects of Modernism

June 1, 1982 - September 3, 1982

The Human Perspective

Recent Acquisitions

March 16, 1982 - May 15, 1982

Austria's Expressionism

April 21, 1981 - May 30, 1981

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele

November 12, 1980 - December 27, 1980

* Egon Schiele

The Graphic Work

October 19, 1970

Austrian Art of the 20th Century

March 21, 1969

* Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

October 31, 1968

The Wiener Werkstätte

November 16, 1966

* Egon Schiele

Watercolors and Drawings from American Collections

March 1, 1965

25th Anniversary Exhibition

Part I

October 17, 1964

Austrian Expressionists

January 6, 1964

Group Show

October 15, 1962

Paintings by Expressionists

January 27, 1962

Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Oskar Kokoschka and Alfred Kubin

March 14, 1961

* Egon Schiele

November 15, 1960

Watercolors and Drawings by Austrian Artists from the Dial Collection

May 2, 1960

European and American Expressionists

September 22, 1959

* Egon Schiele

January 21, 1957

* Egon Schiele

March 12, 1954

Lovis Corinth, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele

May 27, 1953

Small, Good Art Works from the 19th and 20th Centuries

January 27, 1949

* Twenty-Five Years Neue Galerie

Egon Schiele

October 20, 1948

* Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition

April 5, 1948

Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele

September 15, 1945

* Egon Schiele

November 7, 1941

Saved from Europe

Masterpieces of European Art

July 1, 1940

Anton Faistauer, Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele

June 1, 1933

* Unknown Works by Egon Schiele

October 28, 1930

* Egon Schiele

Memorial Exhibition on the Tenth Anniversary of his Death

October 15, 1928

* Egon Schiele

November 20, 1923


May 19, 1992 - September 4, 1992


Bombois, Camille

Coe, Sue

Grosz, George

Kane, John

Klimt, Gustav

Kokoschka, Oskar

Modersohn-Becker, Paula

Moses, Anna Mary Robertson ("Grandma")

Schiele, Egon

Vivin, Louis



Summer, with its comparatively slow pace, provides a congenial opportunity to review the recent past and anticipate the future. With the art world in a state of flux for the last months, such a moment of calm reflection is particularly welcome this year. Few in the art business would contend that the season just ended was a "good" one, but most would agree that the ongoing price adjustments are both necessary and ultimately beneficial. Less frequently noted is the fact that the recent run-up in art prices was so short lived and essentially ill-founded that the current period of correction cannot even properly be termed a downturn. If in many areas prices have reverted to the levels of the mid 1980s, one would do well to remember that those were good, solid years, and that what occurred subsequently was largely fueled by misguided speculation and excessive leveraging. Pretend that the late 1980s never happened, and the present market seems remarkably sane and sound. Best of all, collecting is once again accessible to those with less than limitless means, and art can once again take precedence over money.


In this spirit of renewal and back-to-basics realism, the Galerie St. Etienne has decided this year to present a variation on its customary summer survey. Rather than focusing on a single theme, our presentation has been conceived as three concise exhibitions, incorporating three distinct strains of the gallery's interests. The Naive Vision (including works by Camille Bombois, John Kane, Grandma Moses, Louis Vivin and others) is a return to a genre that, though traditionally part of the gallery's domain, has lately been noticeably absent from our walls. More familiar to our regular visitors will be Art Nouveau & Expressionism, which traces the interrelationship between turn-of-the-century graphic design and the Expressionism of Oskar Kokoschka, Egon Schiele and their German colleagues. Echoing the social concerns of such artists as Käthe Kollwitz, John Heartfield and George Grosz is Sue Coe's Road to the White House, a new series of works documenting the 1992 presidential campaign.


The contributions of nonacademic art to modernism periodically demand reassessment, and it appears that a new wave of revisionism is currently rising. Much attention has lately been accorded so-called "Outsider Art": art created by the mentally ill and other marginal members of society, whose work is usually shaped by an idiosyncratic psychotic or religious vision, rather than by more self-conscious aesthetic considerations. The Galerie St. Etienne, by contrast, has always been more interested in the work of painters who, though denied access to formal training, nonetheless deliberately pursue their craft and attempt purposefully (albeit piecemeal) to absorb whatever pictorial matter is available to them. Both strands of naive art are equally valid and important to the broader development of modernism, but the work of artists such as John Kane and Grandma Moses evinces more varied content and a more complex development than does that of the "Outsiders," who are necessarily limited by the mandate of their initial propelling mission.


Just as folk and naive art provided early modernists with an alternative to staid academicism, so too did the nascent avant-garde find inspiration in the lowly graphic arts. At first glance, it may be difficult to see a connection between the sumptuous, decorative posters of turn-of-the century Austria and Germany and the jarring abrasiveness of Expressionism. However, the highly charged lines and bright, emotive colors of Art Nouveau exerted a formative influence on many young Expressionists. The most direct evolutionary passage is that linking Egon Schiele to his mentor Gustav Klimt, but similar strains may be detected in such diverse artists as Oskar Kokoschka and Paula Modersohn-Becker. Art Nouveau facilitated a freedom from conventional realism that opened up a broad array of aesthetic possibilities. Yet as Expressionism absorbed other influences, most notably Fauvism and Cubism, its Art Nouveau roots gradually became obscured. Nor did the realist impulse ever die out entirely. Especially in the years following World War I, it provided an essential foundation for the social critiques of such artists as Käthe Kollwitz, George Grosz and Otto Dix.


Realism is also central to the socio-political commentary of Sue Coe, who in certain respects has more in common with her Expressionist predecessors than with her present-day contemporaries. Her latest series of works examines in detail the American economic and political climate--of particular relevance in this election year. This is the largest group of conceptually unified drawings that Coe has created since her widely acclaimed Porkopolis series, and it expands greatly upon the stylistic developments presaged in that earlier body of work. The Road to the White House is an evocative mix of overtly political pieces editorializing on the major issues of the moment, and meticulously crafted depictions of society's numerous victims. The latter are as quiet as the former are strident, mirroring the stark contrast separating the realities of American poverty from the glib sound-bites and headlines that those in power use to remain in power.


The United States is clearly in a transitional phase, with far-reaching ramifications for every segment of society. Such upheaval naturally effects the art world, but art is also capable of responding to (and perhaps even influencing) contemporaneous historical events. Certainly the art shown by the Galerie St. Etienne has always--because of its Expressionistic roots--tended to be socially engaged. The present exhibition deals with issues both timely and timeless, and in this respect hopes to offer a basis for reassessment and progress.